Author Introductions #31: Morton S. Gray

Good morning, folks!

Today, I’m writing to you from Majorca, where we’ve been enjoying a villa holiday with some good friends of ours and their children, too, while we collectively squeeze the last drop out of summer. Soon enough, it’ll be back to work and school but, until then, there’s time to make my next Author Introduction! This week, I’m delighted to welcome Morton S. Gray to the blog.

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Morton lives with her husband, two sons and Lily, the tiny white dog, in Worcestershire, U.K. She has been reading and writing fiction for as long as she can remember, penning her first attempt at a novel aged only fourteen. She is a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association and The Society of Authors. Her debut novel The Girl on the Beach was e-published in January 2017, after she won Choc Lit Publishing ‘Search for a Star’ competition. The story follows a woman with a troubled past as she tries to unravel the mystery surrounding her son’s head teacher, Harry Dixon. This book is also available as a paperback as of 10 April 2018.

Morton’s second book for Choc Lit The Truth Lies Buried was published as an e-book on 1 May 2018. Another romantic suspense novel, the book tells the story of Jenny Simpson and Carver Rodgers as they uncover secrets from their past. Morton previously worked in the electricity industry in committee services, staff development and training. She has a Business Studies degree and is a fully qualified clinical hypnotherapist and Reiki Master. She also has diplomas in Tuina acupressure massage and energy field therapy. She enjoys crafts, history and loves tracing family trees. Having a hunger for learning new things is a bonus for the research behind her books.

Sounds like a multi-talented lady! Let’s find out more… 

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I have always enjoyed reading and writing. Like many people, I got caught up in the education sausage machine, went to university and did professional qualifications. I then spent sixteen years working for Midlands Electricity and the only writing I did was meeting minutes, reports and training materials.

Making a brave decision as I approached my forties, I decided to leave a well-paid full-time job to start my own business, as I’d got to the stage of needing something different with more meaning and was not seeing as much of my son as I wanted. Everyone thought I was mad as at that point, as I was a divorced sole parent, but I have no regrets at all.

I came to write seriously after my second son was born. I attended writing classes and did a course with the Open College of the Arts. I joined the Romantic Novelists’ Association’s New Writer’s Scheme, which allows an invaluable novel critique for each year you are a member and began to shortlist in novel competitions. All along, I’d had this dream of being published by Choc Lit, so you can imagine my delight when my debut novel The Girl on the Beach won Choc Lit Publishing’s ‘Search for a Star’ competition in 2016.

 

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

 

I like to take my readers on a journey to solve some sort of mystery. In my second published novel, The Truth Lies Buried, my heroine, Jenny, is at a turning point in her life – her mother has just died and she doesn’t want to return to a job in London. A friend suggests she starts a small cleaning business and her first client is a widower, Carver. The couple realise quite early on that they have something huge in common, both of their fathers disappeared twenty-five years before. It is the mystery of their fathers’ disappearance that they need to solve, at the same time coming to terms with their own personal tragedies and finding even more to bind them together.

 

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

 

In real life, my hero is my husband. He’s a great dad and is a real Mr Fix-it, be it computer, situation or something else not working.

In fiction – I pondered this question for quite a while; did I go for Mr Darcy in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, John Thornton in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South, or Ian Fleming’s James Bond perhaps? I decided in the end to go for a heroine instead and pick Elizabeth Gilbert in Eat, Pray, Love. A lot of people have watched the film, but I find the book teaches me something different each time I read it. She gifted herself a year to travel and found herself and love on the journey.

 

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

 

Sue Moorcroft – Sue was my original inspiration when I started to write. I absolutely love her Middledip books, especially Starting Over, published when she was with my own publisher Choc Lit. I’ve been lucky to attend several courses with Sue over the years and admire her way of writing and teaching. Reading one of her novels is like settling into a comfortable armchair, as they always deliver.

Barbara Erskine – The combination of historical and mythical in her novels is enthralling. Since reading Lady of Hay when it was first published in 1986, I have gone on to read the majority of her novels. I can’t remember which of her books it was that made my heart thud as I read towards the climax, possibly The Warrior’s Princess. I always say that if a novel can produce a physical reaction in me, be it tears, anger or in this case fear, it is well written. I recently attended a session at the Romantic Novelists’ Association (RNA) conference where Barbara was interviewed by RNA chair, Nicola Cornick and it was fascinating to gain an insight into her background and the source of her wonderful stories – a real fan girl moment!

LJ Ross – Since I discovered your books, I’ve been hooked and have read the lot, not hesitating to pre-order when the opportunity arises. Originally attracted to your work because of the North East settings, as we have holidayed in County Durham and Northumberland for many years, I will confess to being a little bit in love with DCI Ryan.

[Blogger’s Note: Thank you, Morton! I quite fancy him, myself…]

 

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

 

I love spending time with my family and friends, reading, walking my dog and learning new things, especially crafts. I have recently been on courses for lino cut pictures, silver clay jewellery and glass bead making. My overriding hobby is researching my family history, which I have done for many years.

 

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

 

Difficult one! Personally, producing my two lovely sons. Career-wise, running my own business and getting my books published.

 

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

 

Five on a Treasure Island by Enid Blyton. All my junior school essays had treasure, big brothers and adventure. I just laughed, as the plot to my latest novel The Truth Lies Buried has buried treasure and adventure – not much changed there then!

 

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

 

All That Was Lost by Alison May. I was fortunate to read an advance copy of this novel, as it isn’t published until 6 September 2018. It is about an aging stage medium and really makes you think about belief, identity and expectations. I’m still thinking about it well after turning the last page.

 

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

 

I have every admiration for anyone who takes on a public office like this, regardless of party. It must be such a stressful existence and one in which you can never please everyone and at times no one at all. If I was being facetious, I would suggest Game of Thrones and if I was being kind I would recommend a book on relaxation or hygge.

 

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

 

Wonder Woman of course. Who wouldn’t want the opportunity to help others and maybe save the world? P.S. Might need a diet to look good in the outfit though!

 

…Thanks, Morton! I’ve also met Sue Moorcroft and thought she was a lovely woman, so I can imagine her being very inspirational as a teacher or as a writer. It’s wonderful to read about women empowering other women because, although life doesn’t always need to be gendered, it certainly doesn’t hurt to know that we can support each other in the world of publishing or elsewhere. It’s been great having you on the blog and I wish you every success with your latest book!

Right now, it’s time to make some more freckles in the sunshine ahead of a busy autumn/winter (DCI Ryan fans, stay tuned for some VERY exciting news towards the end of the month!).

Until next time…

 

LJ x

Well, look who’s back!

Hello there!

I’ve had a little hiatus from the blog, recently, but I’m back and raring to tell you all my news as well as to introduce the next fine author in my series of ‘Author Introductions’ over the next few days (incidentally, if you know of an author who might like to be featured in the future or are an author yourself, feel free to drop me a line at lj_ross@outlook.com). Let’s catch up…

London Book Fair

My, oh, my, what a busy time it has been. Way back in April, I went along to the London Book Fair (LBF) and spent three days on the Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) stand sharing my very positive experiences using their platform to publish my DCI Ryan series with all the budding writers who took the trouble to come along (and there were so many lovely people!).  It was fantastic to catch up with some of my writer friends, too, and hear all about what they’re up to.

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FYI, when faced with a giant image of yourself on a pillar, it’s a great test of #1 on the list below…

 

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With lovely Mel Sherratt

 

People ask me what I take away from events such as these and it’s hard to know what might be more important for writers just starting out – stock advice about editing, formatting and so forth, or interpersonal observations I’ve formed over the past few years? I’ll opt for the latter and tell you I think there are certain ‘rules’ to live by if one is to succeed in the funny old world of publishing. In my humble opinion, these are:

  1. To make sure your head doesn’t get stuck too far up your own arse

I think this one is fairly self-explanatory but, for the sake of completeness, all I will say is that it is neither attractive nor likeable to fall prey to your own hype. From time to time, I caught a whiff of narcissism as I wandered through the rabbit warren of publishing stands at Kensington Olympia and it served as a sage reminder that, no matter how many bestsellers, never forget your roots or believe you are better than anybody else, cos y’ain’t. It’s a question of good practice: the moment you become complacent is the moment you lose your edge and your books lose what made them fresh in the first place. Besides, do you really want people to walk away thinking, ‘What an arrogant git’?

2. To remain positive

The people I met at LBF this year were warm and optimistic with a shared passion for writing and storytelling, and it was uplifting to be surrounded by so many like-minded folk. However, as a general point I think it is useful to guard against what others have called ‘comparisonitis’ (The Creative Penn has written a great article on this very subject here). It is very human to feel insecure from time-to-time, or to worry that your work isn’t good enough, but just remember that half of everything is smoke and mirrors. Today’s film stars may be yesterday’s news. For some writers, success (whatever that means) comes early and, for others, it comes later. But one thing is probably true: it seldom comes to those who have lost the very reason why they wanted to write in the first place – namely, their passion. This applies to writers ‘great’ and ‘small’, because for some people their success is never enough and they always need more, whereas for others every small success is something rightly to be celebrated. Just try not to covet what others seem to have because it will eat you up inside.

3. To listen

The information available to budding authors is sometimes overwhelming and often conflicting. As with so many things in life, you need to form your own opinion and listen to reasoned voices across the spectrum. It is never helpful to exist within an echo chamber, where you hear the same opinion again and again. I am always happy to share my experiences and what I believe to be good advice but it is worth remembering that my own unique publishing experience cannot be replicated. It is about tailoring advice to suit your own work and circumstances, forging your own way forward.

There is so much more I could say but I’ll leave you with my top three for now. Standard advice surrounding the do’s and don’ts of self-publishing is covered comprehensively elsewhere – check out KDP Author Insights here, for a start.

Storyteller Competition 2018

Some of you may recall that I was invited along to the Storyteller Award ceremony in London last year, where my talented friend David Leadbeater took home the inaugural award. I had the privilege of mentoring Dave afterwards (which was more of an exchange between two writing professionals) and, this year, I’m delighted to have been asked to be one of the judges of the competition. I’m a huge supporter of any award that puts the reader’s voice first and is open to all, regardless of background, and does not rely upon any publisher to provide a nomination. It is much more democratic and I’m so excited to read the final short-list. Details of the competition can be found here and, if anybody has a manuscript that has not yet been published, it is well worth entering and being in with a chance of winning a substantial monetary prize as well as a marketing package from Amazon which is worth its own weight in gold. The deadline is 31st August 2018 – good luck!

DCI Ryan

After moving home to Northumberland just before Christmas, life has been an insane whirlwind of house renovations and writing two books within the space of five months. Two books? I hear you cry. But we’ve only seen one…

That’s right, you sneaky detectives. Seven Bridges: a DCI Ryan Mystery (Book 8) was released in May and I was deeply moved and surprised in equal measure when it became a UK #1 bestseller before it was even properly released! I don’t think I’ll ever quite get over the fear of releasing a new story into the world but I can tell you I am always grateful for the support of my readers. You guys are the very best and I never forget it.

But, back to the sneaky second book I wrote while burning the midnight oil (and my optic muscles). It is not set for release just yet but is put aside for another exciting project which I will be able to tell you about very soon. For now, I’ll do the classic writer thing and mutter a sinister cackle and stroke my imaginary beard. In the meantime, I’m writing the next DCI Ryan book and plotting the outline for three brand new books in a series I’ve been hoping to write for a while…watch this space!

So many exciting things to look forward to…but for now, it’s back to chasing around my soon-to-be-five-year-old son as we while away the hours of his nine week – yes, NINE WEEK – summer holiday. Is it September yet?! 😉

I hope you all have a wonderful week ahead!

LJ x

Author Introductions #21: S E Lynes

Good morning!

It’s a snowy day here in Northumberland and the snowflakes are so fat you could sit and watch them fall for hours, admiring their perfect formation. However, there is work to be done! I’m nearly finished with one book and will then be moving straight on to the next, so it’s been a busy February!

But now, I’m taking a break to make my next Author Introduction. This week, I’m delighted to welcome the lovely S E Lynes to the blog. After graduating from Leeds University, S E Lynes lived in London before moving to Aberdeen to be with her husband. In Aberdeen, she worked as a Radio Producer at the BBC before moving with her husband and two young children to Rome, where she lived for five years (that sounds amazing). There, she began to write while her children attended nursery. After the birth of her third child and upon her return to the UK, she gained an MA in Creative Writing from Kingston University. She combines writing with teaching at Richmond Adult Community College and bringing up her three children in Teddington, Middlesex.  She is the author of critically acclaimed psychological thriller, Valentina, published by Blackbird books. Mother, her follow up, was published by Bookouture in November 2017 and The Pact is out tomorrow!

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S E Lynes, best selling author of psychological thrillers

So, let’s find out a bit more about this talented lady, shall we?

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I’m a creative writing tutor at Richmond Adult Community College and the author of psychological thrillers, Valentina, Mother and The Pact. I am married and have three children aged 19, 18 and 12. I met my husband when I was eighteen and each year on our anniversary (if we remember it) we agree to try another year. We don’t like to rush these things.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

My latest book is called The Pact. Readers can look forward to a super-contemporary, tense and emotional read, looking at parenting in the age of social media, the lasting impact of abuse and how our past impacts the decisions we make in the present. I can promise the usual dark, highly unsettling experience. The novel has three voices and I particularly enjoyed attempting the modern day teenage vernacular, with help from my daughter.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

I can’t pick one, that’s impossible, soz! In life, my mum – she is an artist (a ceramicist), she reads widely and is always my first reader. I value her opinion enormously and admire her stoicism and sensitivity. I admire my sister, Jackie, who has devoted her life to helping others through her work with Comic Relief, as well as juggling three young children. And I admire my husband, who loves me even though he knows me and that’s a feat in itself.

In fiction, my hero … no, no, I can’t … too many – but one of the jobs of the writer, as I see it, it to show how ordinary people are heroes in their own lives, simply by fighting their own battles and trying to live each day in the best and kindest way they can.

(Blogger’s Note: I couldn’t agree more – and this is one of my favourite answers to this question, so far!)

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Short story writer, Alice Munro, is probably my all-time favourite, particularly her early collections, Dance of the Happy Shades and Runaway. There is a story of hers called Walker Brothers Cowboy, which is, for me, perfection. Like a lot of the great writers, she is capable of shining a light on seemingly insignificant moments and redefining them as life-altering, sometimes shattering, and that takes great skill and sensitivity.

I was very influenced by Gillian Flynn. I have only read Gone Girl of hers but I can still remember being struck from page one by the quality of the writing and later by the humour – there are some laugh out loud moments. I remember thinking, if I write a psychological thriller, I want to have an undercurrent of dark humour and I want my writing to be of this quality. So, I guess that is what I was aspiring to when I wrote my first thriller, Valentina.

I am also a big Pat Barker fan. I have heard her talk and she wrote three novels before being published with her fourth. In order to find her voice, she had to return to her roots, which she did with her debut, Union Street, and the result was a gritty, authentic piece of work. In the Regeneration trilogy, she mixes fictional characters with fictionalised versions of real people such as Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen. Without Pat Barker, I would never have had the courage to use the Yorkshire Ripper in the fictional world of my main character, Christopher, as I did in Mother.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I really like hanging out. I have a gold medal in hanging out. I like to have coffee or drinks with friends and love a bloody good chat. I love Sunday mornings – big dog walk, then listening to Cerys Matthews on Radio 6 Music while assembling some sort of big stew or a roast dinner for family of friends.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Professionally, I could say getting published after ten years but that’s not my achievement, it’s down to Stephanie Zia at Blackbird Books and her intern at the time, Rosalie Love, who read the first chapter of Valentina and asked for the rest. So, no, it’s not the getting published, it’s the sticking at it when there was no real hope, writing three novels for no other reason than to write them. I was ready to give up when it finally happened. Valentina is my fourth book.

7. What was your favourite book as a child?

Winnie the Pooh.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

I guess the obvious ones are The Golden Compass, The Night Circus, which absolutely did, but Wolf Hall and Bringing Up the Bodies had me gripped and I cannot wait for the third.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Something that would educate her as to how normal people live and the struggles they face. I don’t know if someone has written a contemporary novel about the day to day reality of working in the National Health Service or any public service, but if they have, I would recommend that.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Catniss Everdene. She’s a legend.

…Thanks, Susie! I’ve read Valentina and enjoyed it very much, so will look forward to reading your other books very soon. Thanks for telling us a little more about the woman behind the writer and I’m sure there are many aspiring writers reading your story who will feel inspired to continue their journey.

Wishing you all a very healthy and happy week, tune in next time to meet some more great authors!

LJ x

The Prodigal Author Returns…

Afternoon!

Well, look who just dragged themselves out of social seclusion! Yes, you’ve guessed it… me. How are we all doing? Well, I hope!

I realise I have been somewhat remiss in writing a blog post lately, so I thought I would remedy that situation immediately and let you all know what I’ve been up to. It’s mostly tedious, so if you have better things to be doing such as watching paint dry or fish swimming around a tank, feel free to bow out now.

In a nutshell, the last month has involved:

  1. Packing up and moving our entire family from Somerset to Northumberland, just in time for Christmas. Sheer lunacy, but it’s all over now (I’m still getting flashbacks about the packing).
  2. Do I need to elaborate further? It’s a big deal, especially with an excitable four-year-old, and we celebrated in style by dragging a 13ft tree into our lounge. The problem came when we had to drag it out again…
  3. Releasing my seventh book, Dark Skies. Any indie author will tell you the kind of hands-on dedication this involves, including signing, packaging and sending paperbacks, running competitions, all manner of plates to keep spinning in the air. I don’t have a dedicated team of assistants to help me with all that but I do have a bloody fantastic husband, family, friends and fellow bibliophiles and it’s thanks to them that Dark Skies became my third UK #1 bestseller back in December. Big thanks to all of you!
  4. Renovating the new house. It has great bones but needs a lot of TLC. When I say, “a lot”, I mean there were fifteen workmen in our house just last week ripping out bathrooms, re-fitting bathrooms, replacing radiators, painting, plastering over wood chip…you name it. One thing is certain: if I never have to make a cup of sugary tea ever again, I’ll be a happy woman.
  5. Helping my son settle into his new school. He’s only four and loves going to school, but a house move and the prospect of making new friends is a lot of change in one fell swoop and it was important to give him the attention he needed.
  6. Writing two books. Oh yeah, did I forget to mention? I’m writing two books simultaneously. And if anybody ever tells you that writers don’t work hard, feel free to give them a slap around the chops from me!
  7. The usual round of events, admin, general life…

Having said all that, I thought I’d better stick my head above the parapet in case some of you wondered if I had run off to Timbuktu. It’s always a possibility, but not this week, fair readers.

In other news and on a writerly note, I want to thank everybody who has written to me recently asking for advice, mentoring or to read their works in progress. I am humbled that you feel I would have anything to add to what you have already achieved and wish that I could respond more quickly or commit to an ongoing mentoring relationship. Unfortunately, given how hectic life is at the moment and my own busy work schedule I have had to decline. This is no negative reflection on any of you and I wish you nothing but the very greatest success with your work – it is a sad fact that I do not have the time to read as much as I once did, which is something I am trying actively to remedy. Sending best wishes to all of you!

One thing that I can commit to is the reinstatement of my bi-weekly ‘Author Introduction’ feature on this blog. If there are any authors out there who would like to be featured over the coming year, please contact me at lj_ross@outlook.com with the subject line ‘Author Introductions’ and I will do my very best to include you – it’ll be on a first come, first served basis! I am also keen to showcase writers and new talent from a range of publishing backgrounds and in particular independent authors.

If any reader or budding writer has a burning question they’d like me to answer – this could relate to the DCI Ryan books, writing or publishing in general, then drop me a line with the subject line ‘Blog Questions’ and I’ll do my best to answer them in forthcoming posts!

For now, I’m off to immerse myself in the world of DCI Ryan who, it has to be said, just keeps uncovering twisty crimes in atmospheric settings…

‘Bye for now!

LJ x

 

Author Introductions #19: Louise Jensen

Happy Monday!

After a weekend spent proofreading and playing endless games of Snakes and Ladders with my son, it’s the start of another week and I have a busy one ahead of me – I’ll be heading up to Northumberland for An Evening with L J Ross at Forum Books in Corbridge, followed by an event at Newcastle City Library as part of the Books on the Tyne Festival which is ongoing at the moment and featuring lots of exciting events and authors! There is also the small matter of picking up the keys for our new house…hurrah!

For now, it’s time for me to make the next Author Introduction and, this week, I’m delighted to be joined by the lovely Louise Jensen. I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know Louise over the past couple of years through being part of a charity anthology together and as part of a recent panel at the Althorp Literary Festival and I admire how she manages to juggle being such a loving mother to three children as well as a bestselling author – it’s what we all strive for! Let’s find out a bit more about the woman behind the writer…

Louise Jensen

Louise Jensen, bestselling author of psychological fiction

 

Louise is a USA Today Bestselling Author and lives in Northamptonshire with her husband, children, madcap dog and a rather naughty cat. Louise’s first two novels, The Sister and The Gift, were both International No.1 Bestsellers and have been sold for translation to sixteen countries. The Sister was nominated for The Goodreads Awards Debut of 2016. Louise’s third psychological thriller, The Surrogate, is out now.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

Hello, my name’s Louise Jensen and my most important job is as a mum to my three boys but secondly I write psychological thrillers. I always wanted to be a writer when I grew up and when that didn’t happen I got a ‘proper’ job instead. Several years ago, an accident left me with a disability and I began writing again to distract myself from my chronic pain and compromised mobility. But writing turned out to be more than just a good distraction. My first two novels, The Sister and The Gift were both International No.1 Bestsellers and have been sold for translation to sixteen countries. The Sister was nominated for the Goodreads Awards Debut of 2016.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

The Surrogate is newly published. It’s a story of Kat who can’t conceive but is longing for a family, and Lisa, her best friend who offers to be her surrogate. This book was so much fun to write. I thought I had control but the characters are each strong willed and took me on the ride of my life. Everyone has a secret and even writing it, I wasn’t sure who to trust. The ending has come as a real shock to readers but no-one was more shocked than me! As all my stories are, it’s a blend of mystery and unease, but also an emotional story about friendship and how far we’d go for those we love.

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  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

In real life, EVERYONE who writes. There’s a fabulous network of writers on social media and daily I read posts from those who are struggling to fit writing times around families, jobs and finances. Those who are celebrating career highs. Those who are experiencing the lows. There’s so many people out there following their dreams and I cheer on each and every one of them.

In fiction, Jo March from Little Women. She’s so feisty and confident. I longed to be like her.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Marian Keyes – I read her stories and one minute I’m laughing, the next there’s a lump in my throat, then I’m laughing again. She’s a genius.

Harlan Coben – His Myron Bolitar series has me hooked. Pacey, funny and surprisingly touching in places. An easy read when I’ve had a long day.

Finley – My 11-year-old son is hugely talented. Last week he wrote the opening to a story that is so creepy and mysterious my husband read it and thought it was the opening to my new book. He’s super talented, with an amazing vocabulary, and I’ve no doubt I’ll be reading his books one day.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

My favourite thing to do in the whole world is to sit around the dining table with my family, sharing good food and a nice bottle of wine (the adults!). Now the kids are growing it’s often hard to get them in the same place, at the same time.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Personally – I’ve made three humans!

Professionally – My debut, The Sister, selling half a million copies in its first few weeks of release and reaching No. 1 around the world.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

 Little Women – Louisa May Alcott – it’s the first book I’d read that wasn’t a mystery and made me cry! It made me want to become a writer.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

The Maid’s Room is a debut by Fiona Mitchell based on her experience of living in Singapore. The language is rich, imagery beautiful and already I’m eager for her second book.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

As a former Mindfulness Coach I’d have to say Mindfulness for Dummies written by my mentor Shamash Alidina. Gratitude, compassion and love for each other. Spread the word!

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Wonder Woman – those boots!

…Thanks for taking part, Louise! It sounds like there may be another budding writer in the family – Finley is one to watch! 😉

Wishing you all a healthy and happy week!

LJ x

 

 

 

Author Introductions #18: Nicky Black

Morning!

Today, I’m writing to you from my office in Bath which will soon be replaced with an office in Northumberland, now that we’re making the Big Move North. I’m so excited about returning to the countryside where I grew up and looking forward to introducing my son to all the best beaches (there are so many to choose from) in time for Christmas. But, if there’s one person I don’t have to convince when it comes to the beauty of the North-East, it’s lovely fellow author and friend Nicky Doherty, one half of the bestselling writing duo that comprises Nicky Black.

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Nicky Doherty, one half of bestselling writing duo Nicky Black.

Nicky Black is a collaboration between two friends, Nicky and Julie, who have known each other for around twenty years. They both had careers in urban regeneration back in the 90s, working at the heart of disadvantaged communities in the North East of England. During that time, they experienced the real grit and struggle of peoples’ everyday lives, as well as their humour and determination to lead a happy existence, whatever that meant to them.

Julie has had a career as a script writer, and Nicky has transformed two of Julie’s early scripts into novels. The first is called ‘The Prodigal,’ and the second is a work in progress called ‘Tommy Collins,’ which will be released in the Spring of 2018. To find out a little more about this dynamic duo, I asked Nicky to answer a few short questions which she kindly agreed to do. Here goes…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I’ve been enjoying reading these interviews with some fabulous authors, so delighted to be here.

I was born and brought up in Alnwick, Northumberland, a very beautiful place that I didn’t appreciate at the time. When I’d finished my degree, I moved back to Newcastle and worked in urban regeneration for twelve years. Then I thought I’d give London a go for six months when my contract was up and ended up staying fourteen years. The last couple of years there weren’t very happy ones for me, so I ditched it all last summer and moved back up north. I also turn fifty this year which I can hardly believe. I’m officially middle-aged and the healthiest and happiest I’ve been in years!

[Blogger’s Note: I don’t think any of us can believe that you turn fifty this year, Nicky. What’s your secret?!]

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

Well, my latest book is a couple of years old now – I’ve been working on the second one since August last year. In the first book, The Prodigal, readers can expect quite a moving story, although it’s set amidst a fairly gritty backdrop of urban decay. Whilst it’s a crime novel, at its heart is a love story between a detective, Lee Jamieson, and Nicola Kelly, who is questioning her loyalty to her violent, drug-dealing husband now she has small children. Needless to say, it’s not an easy ride for either of them. I’ll leave it there as I don’t want to give away the plot…

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The next one, Tommy Collins, is set on the same fictional council estate ten years earlier in 1989, and is about a young man who organises raves. It’s his escape, and he gets the chance to organise a massive party, make some serious cash and leave his life of poverty behind. Only, he borrows money from the wrong man. The Detective Chief Inspector, Peach, is a dream to write.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

Annie Lennox. I’ve always been fascinated by her: her voice, song-writing, her effortless androgyny, her dedication to making the world a better place. She’s fierce yet gentle. I can’t explain it, but that voice stops me in my tracks every time I hear it even after all these years. It may sound weirdo stalkerish, but I can’t imagine my life without her music. She also delivers the best “huh!” in pop, in my opinion.

Fiction – I had to look at my bookshelves to answer this one, but it didn’t take long. I’m going to say Heathcliff. He’s just so tortured. I know he’s a cruel character and doesn’t behave in any way heroically, but man, he breaks my heart. And he comes good in the end like all the best heroes.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Roddy Doyle. Funny, moving, gritty – three of my favourite things in any drama. He has this ability to capture mood, emotion and place without describing it in any great detail. It’s all in the dialogue. The Woman Who Walked into Doors is my favourite book of all time, A Star called Henry a close second. I met him recently and he signed my dog-eared copy of The Woman Who Walked into Doors. I’m well chuffed.

Donna Tartt – in contrast to Roddy Doyle, she describes places and people in such detail and with such elegance, I’m in awe. Perfect dialogue, too, and the stories are gripping as hell. The Goldfinch blew me away.

Hmmm. This is hard. I think I’ll say Pat Barker, though I haven’t read anything by her for a while (must rectify that). The Regeneration trilogy is so evocative and sad, but there’s always a message of hope in her books. And she’s a Geordie which is always a winner J. Oh, Catherine Cookson – what a storyteller. (There’s too many, I’ll stop now…).

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I’d like to say something cultural or healthy, but I binge watch TV I’m afraid. Once I’m into a programme, I’m addicted and have to get through it as quickly as possible. At the moment, it’s Suits for entertainment value, and Mindhunter for pure drama and a banging 70s sound track. When I’m not working, writing or binge watching, I love a good night out on the town.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Deciding to change my life and following through (that bit’s important), despite how difficult it all was. I left my job, a relationship that made me unhappy and my life in London to start afresh and give myself space to write. Happiness and a life not bogged down in stress and mistrust can’t be bought. I’m lucky that I have a great family, no mortgage, no kids, so it was achievable. I haven’t achieved what I ultimately want yet, but I’m working on it. I have a plan, and I like that.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

Easy. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I love a rebel, especially one who goes on such a journey of self-discovery. I can’t remember how many times I finished it and went right back to the beginning again.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

The Summer of Impossible Things by Rowan Coleman. It’s not easy to pull of time-travel and make it plausible. That takes some imagination; I loved it.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Anything by Michael Morpurgo or Joyce Stranger, since she seems to think animals can’t feel pain or emotion. Even if they didn’t, we feel pain and emotion for them, and that should be enough.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Louise, from Thelma and Louise! Not that I want to shoot anyone or drive off a cliff, but I admire her loyalty, her badass independence and her bravery. And I love Susan Sarandon.  She can do no wrong in my eyes.

Thank you for having me, Louise, and best of luck with Dark Skies – looking forward to another fix of Ryan!

…Thanks, Nicky! Love your answers and, as a big fan of The Prodigal, I am already looking forward to reading your next book when it comes out. I admire your decision to change the things that weren’t working in your life and strive for a better happiness – that’s a decision I also took a few years ago. You only get the one life, so we might as well use it wisely! For now, I’m off to listen to some Annie Lennox and plot the next DCI Ryan book…

Wishing you all a wonderful week ahead!

LJ x

Author Introductions #17: K A Richardson

Hello!

Once again, it’s the start of another working week and I don’t know about anybody else but I’m quite enjoying the crisp, frosty air and clear sunny skies…it can’t last, of course, but let’s enjoy it while it does! Speaking of enjoying ourselves, it’s time to make another Author Introduction and this week it’s my pleasure to introduce another lovely Northern lass, Kerry Richardson, who writes under the pen name K.A. Richardson.

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K.A. Richardson, author of crime thrillers

Kerry is the author of the North East Police series, all based in our beloved north-east of England. Forensics features heavily in her books as well as an authentic police perspective not often captured in crime novels. So far, she has published With Deadly Intent, I’ve Been Watching You, Time to Play and Watch You Burn. The next in the series, Under the Woods, is due for release in early 2018.

Let’s find out a little more about the woman behind the writer…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I was raised in a single parent family on a council estate in Darlington. I grew up with my mum, Jeannet and my brother, Michael, who is disabled. I’ve loved writing and reading for as long as I can remember – my mum taught me to read before I started primary school and I dived straight into junior books. I had a huge preference for the library as a youngster and a teen – my teenage years were spent with my best friend of the time practically living in the library. I used to go at least 3 times a week and would always withdraw the maximum number! I progressed to crime novels at around 13 years old and have loved them ever since. I’m a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes and own a 1928 edition of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes which I absolutely adore.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

The most recent release is Watch You Burn – this is the fourth in the North East Police series – book 5 in the series, Under The Woods, is hopefully going to be out early 2018 and readers can look forward to getting to know a little more about TJ Tulley – she’s the sister of Jacob Tulley who works in digital forensics and featured as a main character in book 2, I’ve Been Watching You. TJ is still coming to terms with being injured badly during an assault – she has given up her work at a solicitors’ firm and now owns and runs a disabled horse riding centre, which happens to sit on land that a killer is using to store his ‘angels’. It’s basically a story of good and evil (as are most crime novels) and I’m loving writing TJ’s character. She’s the perfect best friend material (which is what she is to me currently since I can’t leave the laptop until I’m done now haha).

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

My hero is real life is my mum, Jeannet Hooks. My mum has not had it easy, bless her – she put her life on hold to raise me and my brother alone due to personal circumstances that were outside of her control. She struggled to make ends meet and would often go without things herself to make sure we were fed and clothed. She was back and forth to hospital a lot due to my brother’s disabilities but still managed to be there for me too. She’s my best friend – we are very close now I’m an adult and I completely respect her and love her to pieces. I’m so proud to call her my mum – she’s one of those women who’d do anything for someone else. She raised me to be strong, independent and nurtured my imagination from day one. She’s always encouraged me to be who I am and do what I want. She’s my mum.

Fiction can’t really compare to my mum – but I always loved Hannibal from the A-Team, because he always had a plan. I like to be prepared for anything and generally attribute this to that philosophy.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Ooooo, tricksy question! So many fab authors that it’s hard to pin point just 3! I’ll try though.

  1. Karen Rose – I love how all her books interweave with characters – I love her strong writing style – and I love how she features normal people that are special, whether that be due to disabilities, or due to circumstances and things happening.
  2. Mo Hayder – I love the darkness of her writing, and being drawn into a story so strongly that it makes me check doors and windows in case fiction becomes reality.
  3. Roald Dahl – he first drew me into his writing not through The Witches or the BFG, but by Boy and Going Solo – I loved reading about his life when he was young and the trials and tribulations he faced. Those two books I must’ve read about 50 times when I was a teenager. I still love them now, as well as all his other writing.

5. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I love to snuggle on the sofa, light the candles, and watch TV with my hubby, Peter. There’s something insanely relaxing about being able to switch off with the one you love.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

You know, I’ve had quite a few. From being a child to now there would be many achievements that I could mention, but perhaps my greatest one (or the one I’m most proud of so far anyway), is writing. As I mentioned earlier, I’ve always loved to write – from little hand-stapled books that I gave to my teachers at school, to today when I have 4 books published and am contracted for another three currently. It blows my mind that I’ve managed to write something that people other than me enjoy. Every time I meet someone new, or see my books in shops, I’m reminded that I actually did that. I wrote the words, formed the story and held other people’s attention. It’s not something that will ever get old, even if I do often still feel it’s surreal and actually happening to someone else!

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

Oooo another tricksy question! I pretty much read the whole children’s library and still own over 220 Enid Blyton books now. I devoured everything! To pin point just one book is just too hard. Especially since my favourites would change week to week! If you put a gun to my head though, I’d have to say The Enchanted Wood by Enid Blyton. It’s the first in the faraway tree series and I absolutely love Moonface – I really wanted him to be my best friend! He loves toffee and has a slide in his house – when you’re a kid that’s all you’d ever need in a best friend, right?

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

The Blue Day Book by Bradley Trevor Greive – this is one of my go-to books. When I feel a bit down (I suffer from depression and quite often things can get on top of me without me realising), I reach for this one. I’ve read it a couple of times in recent months though have owned it for a very long time (along with all the other’s in the same series). This book has a way of connecting me with nature whilst allowing the words to pick me up a little and make me realise that it’s not as bad as it first seems. It helps clear my head a little so that I can think and focus on the positive stuff – this in turn helps the bad stuff fade a little, or at least be pushed back for another day. It’s really quite an inspiring book and never fails to raise a smile.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

How to run an effective government by Wotar U Doo-wing – just joking haha.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Lotty (played by Michelle Rodriguez) in the fast and furious movies – she’s totally kick ass.

…Thanks, Kerry! I think we have a lot in common since my hero is also undoubtedly my mum and we also happen to own a 1928 copy of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – snap! Looking forward to seeing your next book hit the stores in 2018 and, until then, wishing you the best with all your edits… #writersolidarity

Now, it’s time for me to dive back to the world of DCI Ryan, who is currently preparing to roll back into town on the proverbial sin wagon in Dark Skies .  Other than that, I’ll be consigned to the wonderful world of packing and removals as we prepare to hitch a ride on the Ross Family Wagon back up to Northumberland – for good!

Hope you all have a wonderful week,

LJ x

Author Introductions #16: Rachel Amphlett

Hello there!

How was your weekend? Mine was spent visiting some very lovely friends who are expecting their first baby in London. In time-honoured tradition, we kicked off our shoes, stuck an old nineties classic on the telly (I say ‘classic’, it was I Know What You Did Last Summer, which is up for debate) and gathered around with plates of Chinese food to natter about anything and everything. Another good friend of ours came along too and, since she and I are both mothers already, we cackled heartily at the sleep deprivation that is about to hit our friends squarely in the face whilst quaffing champagne (that’s what I call true friendship).

Now, it’s the start of another working week and time to make my next Author Introduction! Today, I’m delighted to welcome the fabulous Rachel Amphlett to the blog.

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Rachel Amphlett, bestselling author of crime and espionage novels

Rachel is the bestselling author of the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the new Detective Kay Hunter series, as well as a number of standalone crime thrillers. Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel’s novels appeal to a worldwide audience and have been compared to Robert Ludlum, Lee Child and Michael Crichton. She is a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers’ Association, and the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold, were sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint in 2014 whilst the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series were contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag in 2017.

Let’s find out a little bit more about this lovely lady…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

Well, I was born in the UK and emigrated to Australia in 2005. I currently live on the northern outskirts of Brisbane, right near to the bush, and I’m a full-time crime fiction writer.

Prior to taking up a pen, I played lead guitar in bands in Oxfordshire, worked in radio in Kent, and also helped to run a busy pub.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

Hell to Pay is the fourth book in the Detective Kay Hunter series, and it closes out the sub-plot that’s been running through the series to date. This time, Kay uncovers the corruption behind the professional and personal upheaval she’s endured, but her quest for justice puts her own life in danger…

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I should probably warn people not to start reading the last part of the book late at night if they have to be up early for work the next day!

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

My real-life hero is my Granddad, who lives back in the UK. In fiction, my hero is Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch, particularly for his motto “everybody counts, or nobody counts”.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

In no particular order:

Michael Connelly, for being so open in his interviews with regard to his writing habits and craft – I always learn something when reading his books, and anyone who’s had the lengthy career he has deserves an enormous amount of respect.

Peter James, for being so generous with his time to up and coming authors and his readers.

Dick Francis – I was introduced to his books by my Granddad and my Mum, and that’s what helped set me off down the path of writing crime fiction.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

Travelling! I love it – even the airports, and it’s brilliant having two passports (EU and Australian) because I can pick the shortest arrivals queue 😉 And did I mention airport bookshops?!

I think I love travelling so much because I’m naturally a people-watcher – whenever we travel we manage to find a little bar tucked out of the way somewhere, and we’ll just watch the world go by after a day’s exploration.

I love discovering the history and culture of other countries, too – wandering around and soaking up all the sights and sounds.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Crumbs, that’s a tough one as I think I’m still learning things and aspiring to do stuff. I am proud of the fact I’ve managed to become a full-time writer – I’ve loved writing stories since I was about eight years old, so to be actually doing it for a living is pretty cool.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

The Famous Five mysteries by Enid Blyton – yeah, I know I cheated 😉

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

Two standouts for me over 2017 have been Block 46 by Johana Gustawsson and Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine – both highly recommended.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Yours or ours? 🙂  Honestly, I’d better keep quiet – I could get into all sorts of trouble with this question, haha…

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Marion Ravenwood from Raiders of the Lost Ark. She was quite feisty, and I wouldn’t want to be a character who couldn’t stand up for herself!

…Thanks Rachel! I can certainly relate to your love of travel and quest for adventure – the Indiana Jones theme tune is the ring tone on my phone, which helps to spice up the school run! I haven’t read a good espionage thriller in a long time, so I am very much looking forward to exploring your Dan Taylor novels and the Kay Hunter crime series.

I hope you all have a wonderful week!

LJ x

Author Introductions #15: Angela Marsons

Happy Monday!

For those not in the know, it was the half term holidays last week and, I must confess, it’s all still a bit new to me. My son is in his first term of Reception class and I’m trying to get used to all this ‘term time’ malarkey / planning around a set timetable / not being able to piss off to Vegas anymore. However, we dived into the spirit of the occasion and drove the Rossmobile (yes, I really did just refer to my car as the ‘Rossmobile’) up to Northumberland, where we are the middle of trying to buy a house. Cue various appointments with builders, plumbers…you name it, we met them. Thank God Ethan’s grandparents are kindly souls who helped us out!

Now, we’re back in Somerset and, as it’s the start of a brand new week, that means it’s time for our next Author Introduction. This week, it’s an absolute pleasure to welcome Angela Marsons to the blog.

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Angela Marsons, bestselling author of crime fiction

 Angela is the author of the Amazon Bestselling DI Kim Stone seriesSilent Scream, Evil Games, Lost Girls, Play Dead, Blood Lines and Dead Souls and her books have sold more than 2 million copies in 2 years. She lives in the Black Country with her partner, their cheeky Golden Retriever and a swearing parrot.

She first discovered her love of writing at Junior School when actual lessons came second to watching other people and quietly making up her own stories about them. Her report card invariably read “Angela would do well if she minded her own business as well as she minds other people’s”.

After years of writing relationship based stories (The Forgotten Woman and Dear Mother) Angela turned to Crime, fictionally speaking of course, and developed a character that refused to go away. She is signed to Bookouture for a total of 16 books in the Kim Stone series and her books have been translated into more than 20 languages. Her last two books – Blood Lines and Dead Souls – reached the #1 spot on Amazon on pre-orders alone.

Now that is seriously impressive! Let’s find out a little more about this lovely lady…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I am a crime writer from the Black Country in the West Midlands.  The seventh instalment of the DI Kim Stone crime series is due to be published on 3rd November. I divide my time between the Black Country and Welshpool with my partner, Julie, our devilish Golden Labrador named Roxy and our swearing parrot called Nelson.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

My latest book, Broken Bones, covers the subjects of grooming, prostitution and the modern slave trade.  That people ownership still exists in the 21st century is unbelievable to me and begged to be explored.

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  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

My hero in real life is without doubt my partner, Julie.  She has faced severe physical challenges since her late teens and still endures horrific pain on a daily basis.  Her limitations have prevented her doing many things but she refuses to even consider having a half empty cup and only finds the positive in any given situation.  She inspires me every day.

My fictional hero is Kathy Mallory from the Carol O’Connell novels.  She suffered a horrific childhood and is borderline sociopathic but still manages to fight for the underdog and do the right thing.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

I love anything by Val McDermid but especially the Tony Hill series. He is a character that sucked me in from the very first book. I find that I am drawn to characters who are a little bit off and not quite normal.

Although not a novelist I am a huge fan of Aaron Sorkin who penned amongst other things the film A Few Good Men and The West Wing.  His skill in combining drama, lifelike characters, emotion and humour is just awe-inspiring.

Karin Slaughter is another favourite of mine.  She is not afraid to make brave decisions and combining the Grant County series with the Will Trent series of books was a stroke of pure genius.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I enjoy nothing more than curling up on the sofa with a book from one of my favourite authors.  With reading time now at a premium this always feels like a real luxury being able to switch off and just enjoy the craft of someone else.  Away from words I enjoy exploring the countryside and finding breath taking new views.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

I would say that realising my lifelong dream of writing for a living is by far my greatest achievement.  Such aspirations were not encouraged at my school, where we were instructed to learn to type.  I left school at sixteen and wrote around full time employment for more than 25 years until Bookouture published my first crime novel, Silent Scream, in February 2015

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

As a child, I always enjoyed Enid Blyton but I would say my favourite book back then was Three into Two Won’t Go by Andrea Newman which I discovered probably earlier than I should have due to my English teacher encouraging me to read above my age.  It was the book that inspired me to want to write the stories and not just read them.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

I recently read A Daughter’s Courage by Renita D’Silva. I adore her books and they always transport me effortlessly into the world of her excellently drawn characters and compelling storylines that span Britain and India. I learn something every time I read her books but the subject of a Devadasi’s life in 1920’s India captivated me and stayed with me for a very long time.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

I would recommend Bella’s Christmas Bake Off by Sue Watson.  I adore this lady’s writing and wicked sense of humour and this book was filled with laugh out loud moments throughout the book and, quite honestly, I think the Prime Minister could do with a bit of a laugh.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Oooh, love this question.  I think I would like to be Clarice Starling from The Silence of the Lambs.  The idea of having to pit my wits against the formidable Hannibal Lecter both terrifies and intrigues me.

…Thanks, Angela! Some great answers and I would love to meet that swearing parrot, one day! The Silence of the Lambs is one of my all-time favourite movies, so I definitely agree with your choice there. Wishing you every success with your latest book and thanks for joining us!

For now, it’s back to motivational Monday music (in my case, Ludacris peppered with the Guns ‘n’ Roses) while I polish and buff my next release.

Have a wonderful week!

LJ x

Bookish reflections

Hello!

Some of you may recall my previous blog post where I mentioned I was due to attend the Althorp Literary Festival this year, as a panellist on independent publishing as well as crime fiction writing. I am always very happy to participate in events like these because it is an opportunity to share my experience and hopefully inspire others to grasp at the opportunities now available in the world of publishing, following what we might call the ‘Digital Revolution.’ Althorp is a lovely place, very serene and beautiful, and I was blessed with some very fine company in the form of the Amazon KDP team in the UK and some other authors who have published independently through their platform (including Mark Dawson, Mel Sherratt and Dave Leadbeater), as well as catching up with Louise Jensen, who was a fellow panellist in a discussion about crime fiction writing and the road to becoming a bestselling author. It was lovely to be invited to an author’s dinner and an overnight stay at Althorp as a guest of the Spencer family, and it was kind of them to open their home and extend their hospitality.

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L – R: Mel Sherratt, Dave Leadbeater and LJ Ross 

There were plenty of interesting questions during the festival and it was great to meet some readers who had travelled to meet us, which was very kind! It’s lovely to hear from people who have enjoyed my books and it spurs me to complete my current ‘Work in Progress’ – thanks to all of you! It was also really helpful to share our different writing journeys to convey the fact that there is no ‘one size fits all’ and everybody has a chance to make their mark.

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With lovely Louise Jensen, chatting about crime

That’s what makes it such an exciting time to be an author nowadays. There are so many different options about how to publish your work and have your stories discovered by readers. Similarly, from the reader’s perspective, there has never been more breadth of choice available or mediums through which to read. For example, my mother suffers from glaucoma and, though she enjoys thumbing through her favourite copies of Daphne du Maurier, she also enjoys the convenience and accessibility of an e-reader. Whether an author chooses to go independent or to rely on a publisher to help them, the fundamentals are the same: we share a love of reading and of books. It is really that simple.

One of the themes that often comes up when I am giving a talk or participating in a panel discussion is what advice I would offer to aspiring authors. What have I learned in my (almost) three years in the business?

Well, here are a few general thoughts…

  1. Have a bit of self-belief

Working in creative industries can entail no small degree of self-consciousness. The very act of creating something brand new and then releasing it into the wider world for people to read and dissect is very nerve-wracking. I am a jibbering stress-ball of worry whenever I release a new book and it makes no difference that I’ve released six best-sellers previously. In fact, it creates an even greater sense of responsibility not to disappoint my readers and the fear of letting people down can be crippling.

That said, I try to remember that we can only be ourselves and that is the best any of us can be. As an author, I’ve been very fortunate to have a kind readership and thousands of lovely reviews, e-mails and positive feedback. However, it is impossible to please everyone and therefore it’s essential to adopt a realistic approach and try not to take it personally when people do not enjoy your work or, worse still, when they cross the street to send an unkind message informing you of the fact. Not everyone was taught rudimentary good manners, after all.

  1. Be your own boss

The publishing world is vast and sometimes a bit opaque to the layperson who is considering dipping their toe into its murky depths. My advice to counteract this would be not to find yourself being put off by the hoards of opinionated people who enjoy telling you what is best for you to do with YOUR career – be your own boss and do your own research. There are countless blogs, websites, books and people who offer their tuppence on how to write, when to write, how to publish, how to market…the list goes on. It is up to you to cut the wheat from the chaff, as it were. If you’re thinking of self-publishing, like me, then the Amazon Author Insights website is a good starting point, as is Hugh Howey’s blog, both of which provide ample insight and should save you a lot of time and effort.

  1. Be brave

There will come a time when you have to decide on the best course of action, whether that be pressing the ‘publish’ button on Amazon KDP, choosing the right editor for your work, deciding on a pricing strategy or marketing campaign or on the title of your book. Any of these decisions requires a degree of bravery and you might make mistakes. It is equally brave to accept when something isn’t working and make changes but the ultimate bravery comes in showing your work to others and accepting helpful critique to make your work stronger. Pride gets you nowhere in the long-run.

  1. Stay motivated

Sometimes, we all suffer from information overload and the prospect of continuing to reach for your dream can seem insurmountable or littered with obstacles. At times like these, my advice would be simple: reach for your favourite book, the one you read again and again, to remind yourself of why you want to be a writer in the first place. Then, cut out all the unnecessary bumf and negativity that is causing you to feel dejected and start afresh. If all that fails, whip out the Rocky IV soundtrack and think like Stallone!

  1. Be kind

Remember, however unmotivated or scared you feel, there is somebody feeling even worse than you. Therefore, be kind. Try to forgive when people express themselves badly or when other writers put you down to bolster their own ego. It will happen, as it happens in any walk of life, and the trick is to take it on the chin and run your own race. None of us knows what difficulties may lurk behind another person’s eyes and it costs nothing to take the higher road.

This is a distilled version of the message I try to convey when people ask me what attitude I take towards my career as an author. I focus on my stories and try to listen to the voice of my reader, whose opinion matters the most. Creativity comes first, business comes second, and courtesy above all else.

That’s all for now, folks! A big ‘thank you’ again for the invitation to Althorp, I had a lovely time.

LJ x