Author Introductions #18: Nicky Black

Morning!

Today, I’m writing to you from my office in Bath which will soon be replaced with an office in Northumberland, now that we’re making the Big Move North. I’m so excited about returning to the countryside where I grew up and looking forward to introducing my son to all the best beaches (there are so many to choose from) in time for Christmas. But, if there’s one person I don’t have to convince when it comes to the beauty of the North-East, it’s lovely fellow author and friend Nicky Doherty, one half of the bestselling writing duo that comprises Nicky Black.

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Nicky Doherty, one half of bestselling writing duo Nicky Black.

Nicky Black is a collaboration between two friends, Nicky and Julie, who have known each other for around twenty years. They both had careers in urban regeneration back in the 90s, working at the heart of disadvantaged communities in the North East of England. During that time, they experienced the real grit and struggle of peoples’ everyday lives, as well as their humour and determination to lead a happy existence, whatever that meant to them.

Julie has had a career as a script writer, and Nicky has transformed two of Julie’s early scripts into novels. The first is called ‘The Prodigal,’ and the second is a work in progress called ‘Tommy Collins,’ which will be released in the Spring of 2018. To find out a little more about this dynamic duo, I asked Nicky to answer a few short questions which she kindly agreed to do. Here goes…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I’ve been enjoying reading these interviews with some fabulous authors, so delighted to be here.

I was born and brought up in Alnwick, Northumberland, a very beautiful place that I didn’t appreciate at the time. When I’d finished my degree, I moved back to Newcastle and worked in urban regeneration for twelve years. Then I thought I’d give London a go for six months when my contract was up and ended up staying fourteen years. The last couple of years there weren’t very happy ones for me, so I ditched it all last summer and moved back up north. I also turn fifty this year which I can hardly believe. I’m officially middle-aged and the healthiest and happiest I’ve been in years!

[Blogger’s Note: I don’t think any of us can believe that you turn fifty this year, Nicky. What’s your secret?!]

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

Well, my latest book is a couple of years old now – I’ve been working on the second one since August last year. In the first book, The Prodigal, readers can expect quite a moving story, although it’s set amidst a fairly gritty backdrop of urban decay. Whilst it’s a crime novel, at its heart is a love story between a detective, Lee Jamieson, and Nicola Kelly, who is questioning her loyalty to her violent, drug-dealing husband now she has small children. Needless to say, it’s not an easy ride for either of them. I’ll leave it there as I don’t want to give away the plot…

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The next one, Tommy Collins, is set on the same fictional council estate ten years earlier in 1989, and is about a young man who organises raves. It’s his escape, and he gets the chance to organise a massive party, make some serious cash and leave his life of poverty behind. Only, he borrows money from the wrong man. The Detective Chief Inspector, Peach, is a dream to write.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

Annie Lennox. I’ve always been fascinated by her: her voice, song-writing, her effortless androgyny, her dedication to making the world a better place. She’s fierce yet gentle. I can’t explain it, but that voice stops me in my tracks every time I hear it even after all these years. It may sound weirdo stalkerish, but I can’t imagine my life without her music. She also delivers the best “huh!” in pop, in my opinion.

Fiction – I had to look at my bookshelves to answer this one, but it didn’t take long. I’m going to say Heathcliff. He’s just so tortured. I know he’s a cruel character and doesn’t behave in any way heroically, but man, he breaks my heart. And he comes good in the end like all the best heroes.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Roddy Doyle. Funny, moving, gritty – three of my favourite things in any drama. He has this ability to capture mood, emotion and place without describing it in any great detail. It’s all in the dialogue. The Woman Who Walked into Doors is my favourite book of all time, A Star called Henry a close second. I met him recently and he signed my dog-eared copy of The Woman Who Walked into Doors. I’m well chuffed.

Donna Tartt – in contrast to Roddy Doyle, she describes places and people in such detail and with such elegance, I’m in awe. Perfect dialogue, too, and the stories are gripping as hell. The Goldfinch blew me away.

Hmmm. This is hard. I think I’ll say Pat Barker, though I haven’t read anything by her for a while (must rectify that). The Regeneration trilogy is so evocative and sad, but there’s always a message of hope in her books. And she’s a Geordie which is always a winner J. Oh, Catherine Cookson – what a storyteller. (There’s too many, I’ll stop now…).

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I’d like to say something cultural or healthy, but I binge watch TV I’m afraid. Once I’m into a programme, I’m addicted and have to get through it as quickly as possible. At the moment, it’s Suits for entertainment value, and Mindhunter for pure drama and a banging 70s sound track. When I’m not working, writing or binge watching, I love a good night out on the town.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Deciding to change my life and following through (that bit’s important), despite how difficult it all was. I left my job, a relationship that made me unhappy and my life in London to start afresh and give myself space to write. Happiness and a life not bogged down in stress and mistrust can’t be bought. I’m lucky that I have a great family, no mortgage, no kids, so it was achievable. I haven’t achieved what I ultimately want yet, but I’m working on it. I have a plan, and I like that.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

Easy. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I love a rebel, especially one who goes on such a journey of self-discovery. I can’t remember how many times I finished it and went right back to the beginning again.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

The Summer of Impossible Things by Rowan Coleman. It’s not easy to pull of time-travel and make it plausible. That takes some imagination; I loved it.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Anything by Michael Morpurgo or Joyce Stranger, since she seems to think animals can’t feel pain or emotion. Even if they didn’t, we feel pain and emotion for them, and that should be enough.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Louise, from Thelma and Louise! Not that I want to shoot anyone or drive off a cliff, but I admire her loyalty, her badass independence and her bravery. And I love Susan Sarandon.  She can do no wrong in my eyes.

Thank you for having me, Louise, and best of luck with Dark Skies – looking forward to another fix of Ryan!

…Thanks, Nicky! Love your answers and, as a big fan of The Prodigal, I am already looking forward to reading your next book when it comes out. I admire your decision to change the things that weren’t working in your life and strive for a better happiness – that’s a decision I also took a few years ago. You only get the one life, so we might as well use it wisely! For now, I’m off to listen to some Annie Lennox and plot the next DCI Ryan book…

Wishing you all a wonderful week ahead!

LJ x

Author Introductions #17: K A Richardson

Hello!

Once again, it’s the start of another working week and I don’t know about anybody else but I’m quite enjoying the crisp, frosty air and clear sunny skies…it can’t last, of course, but let’s enjoy it while it does! Speaking of enjoying ourselves, it’s time to make another Author Introduction and this week it’s my pleasure to introduce another lovely Northern lass, Kerry Richardson, who writes under the pen name K.A. Richardson.

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K.A. Richardson, author of crime thrillers

Kerry is the author of the North East Police series, all based in our beloved north-east of England. Forensics features heavily in her books as well as an authentic police perspective not often captured in crime novels. So far, she has published With Deadly Intent, I’ve Been Watching You, Time to Play and Watch You Burn. The next in the series, Under the Woods, is due for release in early 2018.

Let’s find out a little more about the woman behind the writer…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I was raised in a single parent family on a council estate in Darlington. I grew up with my mum, Jeannet and my brother, Michael, who is disabled. I’ve loved writing and reading for as long as I can remember – my mum taught me to read before I started primary school and I dived straight into junior books. I had a huge preference for the library as a youngster and a teen – my teenage years were spent with my best friend of the time practically living in the library. I used to go at least 3 times a week and would always withdraw the maximum number! I progressed to crime novels at around 13 years old and have loved them ever since. I’m a huge fan of Sherlock Holmes and own a 1928 edition of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes which I absolutely adore.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

The most recent release is Watch You Burn – this is the fourth in the North East Police series – book 5 in the series, Under The Woods, is hopefully going to be out early 2018 and readers can look forward to getting to know a little more about TJ Tulley – she’s the sister of Jacob Tulley who works in digital forensics and featured as a main character in book 2, I’ve Been Watching You. TJ is still coming to terms with being injured badly during an assault – she has given up her work at a solicitors’ firm and now owns and runs a disabled horse riding centre, which happens to sit on land that a killer is using to store his ‘angels’. It’s basically a story of good and evil (as are most crime novels) and I’m loving writing TJ’s character. She’s the perfect best friend material (which is what she is to me currently since I can’t leave the laptop until I’m done now haha).

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

My hero is real life is my mum, Jeannet Hooks. My mum has not had it easy, bless her – she put her life on hold to raise me and my brother alone due to personal circumstances that were outside of her control. She struggled to make ends meet and would often go without things herself to make sure we were fed and clothed. She was back and forth to hospital a lot due to my brother’s disabilities but still managed to be there for me too. She’s my best friend – we are very close now I’m an adult and I completely respect her and love her to pieces. I’m so proud to call her my mum – she’s one of those women who’d do anything for someone else. She raised me to be strong, independent and nurtured my imagination from day one. She’s always encouraged me to be who I am and do what I want. She’s my mum.

Fiction can’t really compare to my mum – but I always loved Hannibal from the A-Team, because he always had a plan. I like to be prepared for anything and generally attribute this to that philosophy.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Ooooo, tricksy question! So many fab authors that it’s hard to pin point just 3! I’ll try though.

  1. Karen Rose – I love how all her books interweave with characters – I love her strong writing style – and I love how she features normal people that are special, whether that be due to disabilities, or due to circumstances and things happening.
  2. Mo Hayder – I love the darkness of her writing, and being drawn into a story so strongly that it makes me check doors and windows in case fiction becomes reality.
  3. Roald Dahl – he first drew me into his writing not through The Witches or the BFG, but by Boy and Going Solo – I loved reading about his life when he was young and the trials and tribulations he faced. Those two books I must’ve read about 50 times when I was a teenager. I still love them now, as well as all his other writing.

5. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I love to snuggle on the sofa, light the candles, and watch TV with my hubby, Peter. There’s something insanely relaxing about being able to switch off with the one you love.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

You know, I’ve had quite a few. From being a child to now there would be many achievements that I could mention, but perhaps my greatest one (or the one I’m most proud of so far anyway), is writing. As I mentioned earlier, I’ve always loved to write – from little hand-stapled books that I gave to my teachers at school, to today when I have 4 books published and am contracted for another three currently. It blows my mind that I’ve managed to write something that people other than me enjoy. Every time I meet someone new, or see my books in shops, I’m reminded that I actually did that. I wrote the words, formed the story and held other people’s attention. It’s not something that will ever get old, even if I do often still feel it’s surreal and actually happening to someone else!

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

Oooo another tricksy question! I pretty much read the whole children’s library and still own over 220 Enid Blyton books now. I devoured everything! To pin point just one book is just too hard. Especially since my favourites would change week to week! If you put a gun to my head though, I’d have to say The Enchanted Wood by Enid Blyton. It’s the first in the faraway tree series and I absolutely love Moonface – I really wanted him to be my best friend! He loves toffee and has a slide in his house – when you’re a kid that’s all you’d ever need in a best friend, right?

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

The Blue Day Book by Bradley Trevor Greive – this is one of my go-to books. When I feel a bit down (I suffer from depression and quite often things can get on top of me without me realising), I reach for this one. I’ve read it a couple of times in recent months though have owned it for a very long time (along with all the other’s in the same series). This book has a way of connecting me with nature whilst allowing the words to pick me up a little and make me realise that it’s not as bad as it first seems. It helps clear my head a little so that I can think and focus on the positive stuff – this in turn helps the bad stuff fade a little, or at least be pushed back for another day. It’s really quite an inspiring book and never fails to raise a smile.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

How to run an effective government by Wotar U Doo-wing – just joking haha.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Lotty (played by Michelle Rodriguez) in the fast and furious movies – she’s totally kick ass.

…Thanks, Kerry! I think we have a lot in common since my hero is also undoubtedly my mum and we also happen to own a 1928 copy of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – snap! Looking forward to seeing your next book hit the stores in 2018 and, until then, wishing you the best with all your edits… #writersolidarity

Now, it’s time for me to dive back to the world of DCI Ryan, who is currently preparing to roll back into town on the proverbial sin wagon in Dark Skies .  Other than that, I’ll be consigned to the wonderful world of packing and removals as we prepare to hitch a ride on the Ross Family Wagon back up to Northumberland – for good!

Hope you all have a wonderful week,

LJ x

Author Introductions #16: Rachel Amphlett

Hello there!

How was your weekend? Mine was spent visiting some very lovely friends who are expecting their first baby in London. In time-honoured tradition, we kicked off our shoes, stuck an old nineties classic on the telly (I say ‘classic’, it was I Know What You Did Last Summer, which is up for debate) and gathered around with plates of Chinese food to natter about anything and everything. Another good friend of ours came along too and, since she and I are both mothers already, we cackled heartily at the sleep deprivation that is about to hit our friends squarely in the face whilst quaffing champagne (that’s what I call true friendship).

Now, it’s the start of another working week and time to make my next Author Introduction! Today, I’m delighted to welcome the fabulous Rachel Amphlett to the blog.

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Rachel Amphlett, bestselling author of crime and espionage novels

Rachel is the bestselling author of the Dan Taylor espionage novels and the new Detective Kay Hunter series, as well as a number of standalone crime thrillers. Originally from the UK and currently based in Brisbane, Australia, Rachel’s novels appeal to a worldwide audience and have been compared to Robert Ludlum, Lee Child and Michael Crichton. She is a member of International Thriller Writers and the Crime Writers’ Association, and the Italian foreign rights for her debut novel, White Gold, were sold to Fanucci Editore’s TIMECrime imprint in 2014 whilst the first four books in the Dan Taylor espionage series were contracted to Germany’s Luzifer Verlag in 2017.

Let’s find out a little bit more about this lovely lady…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

Well, I was born in the UK and emigrated to Australia in 2005. I currently live on the northern outskirts of Brisbane, right near to the bush, and I’m a full-time crime fiction writer.

Prior to taking up a pen, I played lead guitar in bands in Oxfordshire, worked in radio in Kent, and also helped to run a busy pub.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

Hell to Pay is the fourth book in the Detective Kay Hunter series, and it closes out the sub-plot that’s been running through the series to date. This time, Kay uncovers the corruption behind the professional and personal upheaval she’s endured, but her quest for justice puts her own life in danger…

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I should probably warn people not to start reading the last part of the book late at night if they have to be up early for work the next day!

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

My real-life hero is my Granddad, who lives back in the UK. In fiction, my hero is Michael Connelly’s Harry Bosch, particularly for his motto “everybody counts, or nobody counts”.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

In no particular order:

Michael Connelly, for being so open in his interviews with regard to his writing habits and craft – I always learn something when reading his books, and anyone who’s had the lengthy career he has deserves an enormous amount of respect.

Peter James, for being so generous with his time to up and coming authors and his readers.

Dick Francis – I was introduced to his books by my Granddad and my Mum, and that’s what helped set me off down the path of writing crime fiction.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

Travelling! I love it – even the airports, and it’s brilliant having two passports (EU and Australian) because I can pick the shortest arrivals queue 😉 And did I mention airport bookshops?!

I think I love travelling so much because I’m naturally a people-watcher – whenever we travel we manage to find a little bar tucked out of the way somewhere, and we’ll just watch the world go by after a day’s exploration.

I love discovering the history and culture of other countries, too – wandering around and soaking up all the sights and sounds.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Crumbs, that’s a tough one as I think I’m still learning things and aspiring to do stuff. I am proud of the fact I’ve managed to become a full-time writer – I’ve loved writing stories since I was about eight years old, so to be actually doing it for a living is pretty cool.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

The Famous Five mysteries by Enid Blyton – yeah, I know I cheated 😉

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

Two standouts for me over 2017 have been Block 46 by Johana Gustawsson and Stillhouse Lake by Rachel Caine – both highly recommended.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Yours or ours? 🙂  Honestly, I’d better keep quiet – I could get into all sorts of trouble with this question, haha…

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Marion Ravenwood from Raiders of the Lost Ark. She was quite feisty, and I wouldn’t want to be a character who couldn’t stand up for herself!

…Thanks Rachel! I can certainly relate to your love of travel and quest for adventure – the Indiana Jones theme tune is the ring tone on my phone, which helps to spice up the school run! I haven’t read a good espionage thriller in a long time, so I am very much looking forward to exploring your Dan Taylor novels and the Kay Hunter crime series.

I hope you all have a wonderful week!

LJ x

Author Introductions #15: Angela Marsons

Happy Monday!

For those not in the know, it was the half term holidays last week and, I must confess, it’s all still a bit new to me. My son is in his first term of Reception class and I’m trying to get used to all this ‘term time’ malarkey / planning around a set timetable / not being able to piss off to Vegas anymore. However, we dived into the spirit of the occasion and drove the Rossmobile (yes, I really did just refer to my car as the ‘Rossmobile’) up to Northumberland, where we are the middle of trying to buy a house. Cue various appointments with builders, plumbers…you name it, we met them. Thank God Ethan’s grandparents are kindly souls who helped us out!

Now, we’re back in Somerset and, as it’s the start of a brand new week, that means it’s time for our next Author Introduction. This week, it’s an absolute pleasure to welcome Angela Marsons to the blog.

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Angela Marsons, bestselling author of crime fiction

 Angela is the author of the Amazon Bestselling DI Kim Stone seriesSilent Scream, Evil Games, Lost Girls, Play Dead, Blood Lines and Dead Souls and her books have sold more than 2 million copies in 2 years. She lives in the Black Country with her partner, their cheeky Golden Retriever and a swearing parrot.

She first discovered her love of writing at Junior School when actual lessons came second to watching other people and quietly making up her own stories about them. Her report card invariably read “Angela would do well if she minded her own business as well as she minds other people’s”.

After years of writing relationship based stories (The Forgotten Woman and Dear Mother) Angela turned to Crime, fictionally speaking of course, and developed a character that refused to go away. She is signed to Bookouture for a total of 16 books in the Kim Stone series and her books have been translated into more than 20 languages. Her last two books – Blood Lines and Dead Souls – reached the #1 spot on Amazon on pre-orders alone.

Now that is seriously impressive! Let’s find out a little more about this lovely lady…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I am a crime writer from the Black Country in the West Midlands.  The seventh instalment of the DI Kim Stone crime series is due to be published on 3rd November. I divide my time between the Black Country and Welshpool with my partner, Julie, our devilish Golden Labrador named Roxy and our swearing parrot called Nelson.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

My latest book, Broken Bones, covers the subjects of grooming, prostitution and the modern slave trade.  That people ownership still exists in the 21st century is unbelievable to me and begged to be explored.

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  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

My hero in real life is without doubt my partner, Julie.  She has faced severe physical challenges since her late teens and still endures horrific pain on a daily basis.  Her limitations have prevented her doing many things but she refuses to even consider having a half empty cup and only finds the positive in any given situation.  She inspires me every day.

My fictional hero is Kathy Mallory from the Carol O’Connell novels.  She suffered a horrific childhood and is borderline sociopathic but still manages to fight for the underdog and do the right thing.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

I love anything by Val McDermid but especially the Tony Hill series. He is a character that sucked me in from the very first book. I find that I am drawn to characters who are a little bit off and not quite normal.

Although not a novelist I am a huge fan of Aaron Sorkin who penned amongst other things the film A Few Good Men and The West Wing.  His skill in combining drama, lifelike characters, emotion and humour is just awe-inspiring.

Karin Slaughter is another favourite of mine.  She is not afraid to make brave decisions and combining the Grant County series with the Will Trent series of books was a stroke of pure genius.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I enjoy nothing more than curling up on the sofa with a book from one of my favourite authors.  With reading time now at a premium this always feels like a real luxury being able to switch off and just enjoy the craft of someone else.  Away from words I enjoy exploring the countryside and finding breath taking new views.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

I would say that realising my lifelong dream of writing for a living is by far my greatest achievement.  Such aspirations were not encouraged at my school, where we were instructed to learn to type.  I left school at sixteen and wrote around full time employment for more than 25 years until Bookouture published my first crime novel, Silent Scream, in February 2015

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

As a child, I always enjoyed Enid Blyton but I would say my favourite book back then was Three into Two Won’t Go by Andrea Newman which I discovered probably earlier than I should have due to my English teacher encouraging me to read above my age.  It was the book that inspired me to want to write the stories and not just read them.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

I recently read A Daughter’s Courage by Renita D’Silva. I adore her books and they always transport me effortlessly into the world of her excellently drawn characters and compelling storylines that span Britain and India. I learn something every time I read her books but the subject of a Devadasi’s life in 1920’s India captivated me and stayed with me for a very long time.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

I would recommend Bella’s Christmas Bake Off by Sue Watson.  I adore this lady’s writing and wicked sense of humour and this book was filled with laugh out loud moments throughout the book and, quite honestly, I think the Prime Minister could do with a bit of a laugh.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Oooh, love this question.  I think I would like to be Clarice Starling from The Silence of the Lambs.  The idea of having to pit my wits against the formidable Hannibal Lecter both terrifies and intrigues me.

…Thanks, Angela! Some great answers and I would love to meet that swearing parrot, one day! The Silence of the Lambs is one of my all-time favourite movies, so I definitely agree with your choice there. Wishing you every success with your latest book and thanks for joining us!

For now, it’s back to motivational Monday music (in my case, Ludacris peppered with the Guns ‘n’ Roses) while I polish and buff my next release.

Have a wonderful week!

LJ x

Author Introductions #14: Peter Best

Hello there!

I’m writing to you slightly later than planned thanks to a long journey north yesterday, followed swiftly by a full day of work today – writing and business meetings followed by a stint at BBC Radio Newcastle pre-recording an interview that will be aired in a couple of weeks or so. Oh, and the small matter of Mini-Me being on his half-term holidays this week…

However, now that I’m re-fuelled (with cake and coffee at a lovely little coffee shop in Wylam, Northumberland), I can get down to the fun stuff! After all, Mondays are ‘Author Introduction’ days, and today I’m delighted to welcome a fellow Northerner and suspense novelist, Peter Best, to the blog.

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Peter Best, suspense and crime novelist

Peter was born in the North-East of England in the early sixties. He was brought up in a mining community and served an apprenticeship working on building sites as an electrician after leaving school where he made friends he describes as ‘real’ people who now feature in his novels. Likewise, the characters he has met during his travels over the years have also worked their way into his mind and into his novels. He spent time in Wiesbaden in Germany with his wife (who is German), where he fell in love with the culture and neighbouring county of Bavaria, but it was not until he returned to England that his writing solidified and his ideas came together for The Burden of Truth and its sequel. Now, he lives with his wife and daughter in the small seaside town of Frinton-on-Sea, in Essex, which features alongside the neighbouring town of Walton-on-the-Naze in his novel.

To help us discover a bit more about Peter, I asked him a few short questions he has kindly agreed to answer…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

Many years ago, when I was at school, my English teacher said to me, “Peter, you have a vibrant pen.” So that’s how it all started, from what I can remember. Since childhood, I have loved reading and writing and I just never stopped. Mostly, it was just short stories which will never see the light of day. To be honest, most of them have never even been read by anyone, even my closest friends and family. However, they all knew of my fascination with writing.

It wasn’t until I returned from living in Germany that I first had the idea to take the plunge and write novels. At that time, I first started to string together my thoughts and ideas behind my first novel, The Burden of Truth. I absolutely loved writing that book and even if I admit to being very frustrated with it some of the time, I can look back and say it has been one of the happiest and most worthwhile experiences of my life.

At the moment, I’m working on two other novels. The first being the sequel to The Burden of Truth, and the second being a story set in The Highlands of Scotland which has more of a crime feeling to it. All in all, it’s coming along quite well so far.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

I believe, or at least I hope, the first thing the reader will look forward to when they pick up my book, is that they would receive many hours of enjoyable entertainment. Now I’m not trying to be boastful, but others have told me my novel is well paced with interesting characters. I have also been told it has an interesting and intelligent plot, with more than its fair share of twists and turns. It’s also dramatic and full of suspense, set in some great locations. As I said, this is what has been said to me in the past and of course I hope future readers can look forward to that too.

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However, that’s not all; not by a long chalk. When I first set out to write, The Burden of Truth, I wanted it to be more than just a story. I wanted the reader to think about the book so much that it got under their skin.

So, to answer the question further; what can readers look forward to? Well, a book with a deeper meaning. There are many messages in the book. Some are plain to see when you start getting into the nitty-gritty of it. However, some are hidden between the lines. I want the reader to enjoy the book more than anything else but if the reader does wish to delve into the book to discover the hidden messages and understand them, well that would be great.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

I heard of a story about a rock climber called Joe Simpson and I’m going to pick him as my real life hero. Back in 1985, he went on a climbing tour of the Peruvian Andes where he successfully conquered one of the peaks there. I’ll be honest and tell you I can’t remember which one or the height, but it was one of the most difficult. On the descent he fell and got into a great deal of trouble. Unfortunately, this fall broke his leg. Normally, a situation like that would mean almost certain death. However, this man survived the mountain by having the sheer willpower to live, even through the conditions and terrible bad luck. You can read his harrowing story in his account of what had happened in his book, Touching the Void. If you do, then you will realise just why he’s a hero.

As for my fictional hero; I’m going to say, Lisbeth Salander from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Not only was she a great character in the book, she went through hell and back with all sorts of things that have happened to her in the past, as well as truly horrible experience during the course of the story. She is a heroine to me because she had a great sense of doing the right thing, and an incredible sense of justice.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

I have many favourite writers, but I’ll mention three here. The first is Stieg Larson, who wrote The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and two follow-ups. The reason he is on my list is because the plotlines were great. Really, I was blown away with all three books.

The second on my list is Jeffery Archer. Now, I know a lot of people can be somewhat negative about this author, but I love his work just for the simple way he can make a story so entertaining and enjoyable to read.

Now onto the third. I’m going to go with a lady by the name of Jan Petkin. She writes historical fiction. To me, her books are great. They’re well written with great characters, superb settings and plotlines. Mix the four together and you’re in for a treat and she seems to do this with ease. Certainly, a name to look out for in the future – well, that’s my prediction anyway!

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

Okay, I’m going to let you all know my little secret. I play the harmonica. Very badly, I should add, even though I practice at least half an hour most days.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

What a great question this is to mull over. I think this depends on how I’m looking at life at the time. In a way, I could say finishing The Burden of Truth is up there, as I felt very proud when I first held my book in my hand. Or I could say the electrical contracting business I developed. However, when I really think about it I think my greatest achievement is how my wife and I have worked through many great upheavals in our lives. So many illnesses and problems have been thrown our way, especially in the direction of my wife. Happy to say, up to now, we’ve come through them all.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

I read many stories as a child; adventure stories mostly. Alistair McLean’s Ice Station Zebra is the one which comes to mind first. I remember thinking: what a great adventure it would to be in the arctic battling against everything the weather could throw at you. However, I should say my favourite book wasn’t a storybook. It was an instruction book on how to sail. I must have read that over and over again as it gave me a sense of adventure. When I read that book my mind always wandered as I imagined sailing up rivers, across lakes in faraway lands. Loved it. By the way, as I got older I did get into sailing at one time and spent many a happy hour sailing around the backwaters of Walton on the Naze.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

All the Light We Cannot See by Antony Doerr. I just loved how this book was written and how it captured the horrible times of the Second World War in France as well as Germany. Highly recommended read.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

I think I would give her one of the many books we have on our bookshelves which cover the subject of Buddhism. I say this because wouldn’t it be great if she actually learned about working with ethics as well as being mindful? Perhaps then she could put some of the teachings of the Buddha into her policies. Who knows, we might even end up having a little respect for each other.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Easy. Robert Langdon from The Da Vinci Code and all the other books and films in the series. I would love his job learning about the meanings of symbols, and then travelling the world giving lectures about everything you’ve learned.

…Thanks, Peter! Some great answers there and thank you for sharing some insights into what inspires your writing and the books that fed your imagination as a child, I’m looking forward to reading The Burden of Truth. 

It’s goodbye for now – wishing you all a very happy and healthy week ahead!

LJ x

Author Introductions #12: Tana Collins

Good morning!

It’s a rainy start to the week here in Bath, which means it’s definitely ‘Big Coat’ time! I have to say I love Autumn, with its falling leaves and nippy weather – just cool enough to start a fire, or dig out your woolly jumpers. I’m feeling oddly energised to crack on with the rest of my current Work-in-Progress but, before I do, I thought I’d take a moment to make my next Author Introduction in the form of the lovely Tana Collins.

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Tana Collins, crime fiction novelist

Tana is an Edinburgh-based crime writer and author of the Jim Carruthers detective series, set in Fife. The first book in her series, Robbing the Dead, became a top ten Amazon Scottish Crime Fiction bestseller as did its sequel, Care to Die. Published on 1st June 2017, Care to Die has been described by Peter Robinson as, “…a finely plotted mystery” which “racks up the suspense”, with her cop DI Jim Carruthers being “one to watch”.

Well, that all sounds good to me! Why don’t we find out a little more about Tana…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I was born in Yorkshire but grew up in rural East Sussex. It was rather quiet there as I recall. I entertained myself as a teenager by listening to police messages I managed to intercept on my radio. (Ssssh. Don’t tell anyone!) I always loved to try to solve a crime and imagined solving them before the police! It was all going so well, until they caught me. Roll on thirty-five years and I now live in Edinburgh where I’m writing my third Inspector Carruthers novel with a book deal behind me.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

I try to create a strong sense of place with interesting characters in my novels and I’ve been told that I don’t shirk from writing about difficult subjects, which is true. I like that feeling of unsettlement you can get when reading a piece of crime fiction but I also like to base my novels on real life stories.  The Inspector Carruthers series is set in the picturesque East Neuk of Fife, although the latest case takes our Inspector to Iceland! You can expect a gritty read in Care to Die but with a hugely emotional side to the plot. I have been really fortunate in that both Robbing the Dead and Care to Die have been Top 10 Amazon bestsellers in Scottish crime fiction and I’ve had some great reviews.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

Ooh, what a good question. I guess, as cheesy as it sounds, all the unsung heroes in the world. I’ve spent a fair amount of time recently in hospital because my father-in-law has been so ill. The caring and wonderful NHS staff almost reduced me to tears! In fiction, I think it would have to be Peter Robinson’s DCI Banks! He’s so dependable, isn’t he?

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

It’s no secret that my favourite writer is Peter Robinson. I love his characters and setting. I was privileged to fly to Estonia a few years ago to study crime writing with him when he was giving a summer school course at Tallinn University and Tallinn becomes the setting for my third novel, Mark of the Devil, to be published in 2018.  Without giving too much away I had to do an awful lot of research on international art crime for that one! I also love Robert Goddard as his novels are so complex and I just love the historical element he weaves in to his writing. And Ann Cleeves, both for her Shetland and Vera series. I nearly wept when I heard recently she wasn’t going to write any more of the Shetland series!

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

Again, don’t tell anyone, but I love my afternoon naps. Nothing like curling up in bed with my cat, Smudge. My partner, Ian, thinks I’m being lazy but I keep telling him that’s where all my ideas germinate for the next Inspector Carruthers book. When I’m not napping or writing I’m out with a pair of binoculars and a butterfly ID book. I’m currently taking part in Butterfly Conservation’s the Big Butterfly Count.  It’s great fun!

6. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

It’s pretty hard to beat getting a three book publishing deal when you have spent ten arduous years writing and there’s no better feeling than seeing your book in print. That said, I’m also pretty proud of the fact I’ve got an MA in Philosophy from the University of Western Ontario. The university had its own police force that cycled around the campus in tight shorts. Some things you just don’t forget.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

It has to be Enid Blyton’s the Famous Five series. It was an early introduction to reading a series! I think I always knew I wanted to create a series using the same characters. Readers seem to love the way the characters of Jim Carruthers and Andrea Fletcher are developing which has given me immense pleasure.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

Well, I read Yrsa Sigurðardóttir’s Silence of the Sea recently and found it so creepy I didn’t sleep for a week!  Am I allowed to say I love all the DCI Ryan books? Any book that has a terrific sense of place and great characters captures my imagination.

[Blogger’s Note: You’re definitely allowed to say… 😉 ]

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

That’s a fiendish question to answer! I’m not answering that on the grounds that it might incriminate me! That said, I’d love to see what your other authors have written.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Well, being a huge Arsenal fan, like my female detective, Andrea Fletcher, I think I would have to be Colin Firth in the film Fever Pitch!  I love football. Or I would have been Dee Hepburn’s character in Gregory’s Girl. I was so jealous!! Or I would love to have been any character in Local Hero. I loved that film. There you go. I’ve given you three.

Can I just say at the close of the interview, Louise, what a great pleasure it’s been answering your questions. Thank you for featuring me!

…It’s been great having you on the blog, Tana! I love to hear about fresh talent and I’m sure the readers do, too. I’m looking forward to reading your new book about international art crime – sounds fantastic.

For now, though, it’s back to Microsoft Word I go, as I iron out some tricky scenes in DCI Ryan’s seventh outing, Dark Skies. Wishing you all a happy and healthy week!

LJ x

Author Introductions #11: Barbara Copperthwaite

Good morning!

How was your weekend? A disproportionately large part of mine was spent trawling through bathroom brochures in anticipation of our forthcoming house move and it led me to realise two very important things:

  1. There are a lot of bathroom styles to choose from, in every shape, style, finish and price your heart could desire.
  2. I don’t care half as much about bathrooms as I thought I did…

Following this revelation, I was able to focus again on the world of DCI Ryan – phew! But now, a brand new working week stretches ahead of us and it is time to introduce our next author, the lovely Barbara Copperthwaite.

Me

Barbara Copperthwaite

Barbara is the author of best-selling psychological thrillers Invisible, Flowers for the Dead, and The Darkest Lies. Her new book, Her Last Secret, will be published on Friday 13th October, but you can pre-order it right now!

Much of her success is thanks to her twenty-plus years’ experience as a national newspaper and magazine journalist. She’s interviewed the real victims of crime – and also those who have carried those crimes out. Thanks to people sharing their stories with her, she knows the emotional impact of violence and wrong-doing. That’s why her novels are dark, realistic and tackle not just the crime but its repercussions.

Now, to find out a little bit more about this talented lady, I asked her a few short questions which she has kindly agreed to answer…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I always find this question the hardest to answer because I never know what to say! But here goes… I’m a cake-obsessed, nature-loving, bestselling author of psychological thrillers.

I love trying to get under the skin of unlikeable characters, or working out how someone can be pushed to the edge (and often over) in my books.

In my spare time, when not being press-ganged into throwing tennis balls by my dog, Scamp, I can generally be found hiding behind a camera taking wildlife pictures. I love sketching, too.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

Her Last Secret is the taut tale of the Thomas family, who appear to have it all, until one day Benjamin Thomas’s mistress confronts his wife. It’s told from the perspective of each family member, and is set in the run-up to Christmas. Spiralling secrets and festering vulnerabilities are revealed as the family unit unravels to an explosive showdown.

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  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

As a journalist, I interviewed countless people who suffered all kinds of terrible traumas. Their resilience, strength, and humour in the face of adversity was incredible. Each and every one of them is a real-life hero, and they inspire me to write my fiction.

My favourite fictional hero? I wouldn’t mind being rescued by Luther, from the TV series, or Jamie Fraser, from the Outlander series. Take a look at them and you’ll understand why!

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Too tough a question, so I’ve narrowed it down to crime only – and even then, it’s impossible, as I keep changing my mind every minute. But I’ve gone for:

Peter Swanson – I have a writer crush on Peter Swanson for creating The Kind Worth Killing. It’s a book I never tire of recommending to people.

Patricia Highsmith – a trailblazer in the crime genre, Patricia Highsmith was ahead of her time. In Tom Ripley, she created a killer who readers actually root for despite themselves. That takes some doing.

Stuart MacBride – He balances grit and gore with laugh-out-loud humour. It shouldn’t work,  but it absolutely does.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

As soon as I finish writing for the day, I grab my camera and take Scamp for a long walk. Photographing nature forces me to live in the moment, rather than worry about the past or the future, or how I’m going to get away with fictional murder. I can lose hours taking pictures of butterflies, dragonflies, birds… Conservation is a real passion of mine, and I used to have a wildlife blog. I have dreams of one day resurrecting it. No matter what the weather, the great outdoors always calls, and I think this reflects in a lot of my writing.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

My greatest achievement is still to come, hopefully.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

Ooh, another tough one! As a child, I re-read all of my books countless times, as I was such a voracious reader. I’m torn between two books. The Children of Cherry Tree Farm, by Enid Blyton, kick-started my reading habit. Before then I wasn’t bothered, but something clicked as the tale unfolded of children relocating to the countryside and learning about nature. As well as giving me a love of reading, I think it also ignited my passion for wildlife, so I owe it an awful lot.

The other possibility is The Little White Horse, by Elizabeth Goodge. I so wanted to be the heroine, Maria. The dog in my novel The Darkest Lies is named Wiggins, after Maria’s pet.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

For sheer breath-taking twist, it has to be Behind Her Eyes, by Sarah Pinborough. It’s a Marmite book, but I loved the way it started out appearing to be one thing and turned everything on its head. Another great recent read was Sweetpea, by CJ Skuse. It made me laugh, gasp, wince, and feel horrified, all in equal measure.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

I don’t lend books to people unless I know them very well! And even then, they have to promise not to turn the corners of pages down, crack the spine, spill tea or coffee on it…the list is endless! So, I’m afraid the Prime Minister would leave empty-handed, lol.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

I’d be Hildy Johnson in His Girl Friday, the 1940 Howard Hawks screwball comedy. She’s a hard-bitten New York newspaper journalist trying to save a man from death row. She’s funny, clever, determined, successful, and knocks out wise-crack after wise-crack. And she (re)marries Cary Grant at the end of it. What more could I ask for?

…Thanks, Barbara! Some great answers there, and definitely a shared love of old Cary Grant movies, too. Many thanks for taking part and sharing your experiences!

For now, it’s time to get back to work, I’m afraid (*collective boo*). I need to squeeze in a week’s worth of work into two or three days, as I’m going to be away from home  towards the end of this week to attend the Althorp Literary Festival from 5th-8th October. I’ll be a panellist alongside some fantastic authors (Mel Sherratt, Dave Leadbeater, Mark Dawson and Louise Jensen, to name a few) and we’ll be chatting about our experiences, our characters and what makes our writing tick. Hope to see some of you there!

LJ x

Author Introductions #6: M J Lee

Hello! 

Monday has rolled around and this week I am writing to you from an overcast but cheerful Edinburgh. Although work doesn’t often bring me to this fair city, I’m very pleased to be spending a few days here in support of my sister as her theatre group complete a month spent at the Edinburgh Festival. Their company have been winning awards for their production of Peer Gynt (complete with enormous puppets and whatnot) so it’s great to come up and cheer them on. Aside from that, Edinburgh holds a special place in my heart as it happens to be the location of my very first ‘date’ with Mr Ross fourteen years ago and we are celebrating our wedding anniversary today!

Now, enough of all that mushy stuff…

Every Monday for the next few weeks I’ll be introducing a new author, from varying genres and roads to publication, and this week I’m delighted to welcome Martin Lee to the blog, who writes historical crime fiction and historical novels under the pen name M J Lee.

M J Lee, bestselling author of historical crime fiction

After spending twenty-five years working in advertising as an award-winning copywriter and creative director (everything from Cannes to the United Nations!) Martin now writes fantastic works of fiction. When he’s not writing, he splits his time between the UK and Asia.

To find out a little more about the man behind all those richly textured novels, I sent Martin a few short questions which he has kindly answered…

1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

Hi there, thanks for having me, Louise. My name is Martin Lee, but I write under M J Lee. I spent most of my life working in advertising as a Creative Director. No day was ever the same and I grew to love the buzz of being paid to sit and stare out of the window. For me coming up with ideas is never a problem, but finding the time to implement them is. Nowadays, my time is planned up to two years in advance as I know the books I have to write and the research I have to do. I do miss the speed and unpredictability of advertising but I don’t miss the clients. In my past life I was also an encyclopaedia salesman, a refugee worker, and English teacher and I dubbed pornographic movies. But don’t ask about the last one.

2. Ooh, er, missus! How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

The latest book is called The American Candidate. Funnily enough, I finished it six months ago but it has now become immensely topical. Jayne Sinclair, my genealogical investigator, is asked to investigate the family background of a potential candidate for President of the United States. Almost immediately she begins to unearth some unsettling facts about his family’s past. And when the man who briefed her is murdered in cold blood, she finds herself in a race against time to discover the truth…


3. Sounds intriguing! Who is your hero in real life and in fiction? 

In real life, it has to be Nelson Mandela. How a man could be so magnanimous to the people who kept him prisoner for over twenty years was amazing. I don’t know if I would be so forgiving. In fiction, it would have to be Stephen Maturin from the novels by Patrick O’Brien. An amazing combination of knowledge, science and an understanding of humanity in an all-too-human character.
4. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

John Steinbeck, Ernest Hemingway, William Boyd for their understanding of the human condition and the writing skills to portray it in an interesting and dramatic way. Although, I think Boyd has gone off the boil in his last couple of novels.

5. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time? 

Walking. I’m a professional flaneur. It allows my feet to wander and my mind to roam free.

6. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

That’s easy. My daughter. She’s now nearly five. I was a very late dad, I never felt old enough to have children before I became a father. It’s wonderful to see the world through her eyes.

7. What was your favourite book as a child?

I don’t know the title but it was a book of the history of English kings and queens. I remember vividly reading it in bed when I was about six years old. I think it gave me a love of history that I have retained to this day.

8. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

I’ve just discover the Martin Beck novels of Maj Sjowall and Per Wahloo. They were both writing in the late sixties and early seventies and were the founders (I think) of Scandi Noir. Despite being nearly fifty years old, the books have a modernity that is breathtaking, as if they were written yesterday.

9. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

If Theresa May came knocking at my door I would give her The Joy of Sex. It might finally bring some joy into a joyless person.

10. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be? 

Yoda. I think I look like him anyway. I certainly write like he speaks (or so my editor tells me…)

…Thanks Martin! Great answers (especially #9) and I am looking forward to getting stuck into some of your books. Every novel requires a degree of research but I’ve always admired writers of historical fiction for all the meticulous preparation you do, even before putting pen to paper. I’ve been hearing great things about The American Candidate, so that will be first on my list!

For now, it’s back to the grindstone for me (DCI Ryan is being difficult, as usual) and I’ll catch you all later!

LJ x

 

A note of thanks…

They say, ‘lightning never strikes twice’ but sometimes, in the world of books, it does.

Let me explain…

As some of you will be aware, back in May 2015, my debut novel Holy Island nearly gave me a cardiac arrest when it managed to top the UK Kindle chart at #1 (knocking The Girl on the Train off the top spot, although I don’t imagine that gave Paula too many sleepless nights considering the rollicking and well-deserved success of her own book!) Nonetheless, when that happened, I was in a state of mild shock for quite some time afterward and probably, on some subliminal level, I still am. You see, I had no expectations. I hadn’t read every tome on ‘How to be a Writer’ and hadn’t taken endless courses on creative writing, although I was well trained in drafting as a lawyer. I didn’t have an established author platform or a degree in marketing, nor an agent, for that matter. Added to which, I had recently turned down an offer of traditional publication in favour of independent publishing through Amazon KDP and some people probably thought I’d taken leave of my senses. I didn’t have a big publishing house to support me, to pay for advertising space on tables in chain book stores or in magazines, to plaster it across bill boards or distribute my book on supermarket shelves, to guarantee membership rights to all the ‘right’ associations and don’t even get me started on things like television and foreign rights. (N.B. It is a fallacy to think that a traditional deal will equate to investment of this kind – the publisher is a business and they must prioritise resources like any other commercial venture, which usually means investing in established, ‘big hitting’ authors rather than unknowns).

No pressure, then. 

What I did have was complete freedom to produce a body of work on my own terms, without anybody telling me ‘you can’t do that’, or ‘you should write like this.’ I had access to professional editing and proofreading, which I sourced myself, to ensure quality standards. I started out making my own covers but could easily hire a professional cover designer, as many of them work freelance nowadays. I was responsible for making the book visible, as far as I could. Let’s not forget that none of this would have been possible without the revolutionary publishing platform Amazon created, which allows thousands of people to realise their dreams rather than relying on the decision of a minority few. Not every indie book will become a bestseller but at least the readers are the ultimate arbiters and every writer is given the chance to try.

Louise Call to Bar

The day I was called to the bar, quite a few years ago!

 

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This little bumble bee gifted me the time and impetus to change career

The fact is, I just wanted to write my story and retain creative control. I had resigned a well-paid job as a regulatory lawyer and decided to take a short career break to figure out what I’d prefer to do with my life. As an avid reader, writing seemed to beckon. However, the process was – let’s say interrupted by the arrival of our son, Ethan. Having spent a lifetime being told that I might never be able to have children, this news came as a huge, momentous, wonderful surprise and seemed like a kind of miracle. I felt extremely protective of the little bundle I carried and felt less inclined to scurry around the streets of London looking for another stressful job. It was therefore thanks to Ethan that I decided to open my laptop and start writing the story I’d first imagined on a train journey between Newcastle and Edinburgh, looking out across the North Sea to Holy Island.

The success of its sequels (Sycamore Gap, Heavenfield, Angel and High Force) has been very much like a series of aftershocks. With each new release, I am consumed with nerves and very anxious to know how it will be received. There is never any sense of complacency or an assumption that readers will enjoy a book because they have enjoyed the others. The same effort, sweat and tears goes into every manuscript. I certainly never thought another book of mine would reach the same top spot as Holy Island because…well, lightning doesn’t strike twice. I’m not a greedy person and I remember very clearly saying to my husband, “That’s it, for me. If I never sell another book, I’ll always be able to cherish this moment.” Turns out, I have an even kinder readership than I thought, because on 1st June my forthcoming book Cragside managed to claw its way to the #1 UK Kindle spot – and it hasn’t been released yet!

 

I don’t think a simple ‘thank you’ can really convey the deep gratitude I feel for all those people who have supported my writing and enjoyed the DCI Ryan series. It’s great to be able to say a book was a bestseller but, more importantly, to be able to say it came into being because a million people have read my books and deemed them worthy. The readers are the true gatekeepers and it is their opinion that matters to me the most.

Thanks to all of you!

LJ x

 

How to publish independently with Amazon…and have a Guinness afterwards.

Hello!

After a fairly emotional few weeks following a bereavement in our family, I was very happy to get away from it all with Mr Ross for a few days. I managed to combine business with pleasure by accepting Amazon Kindle Direct Publishing’s very kind offer to come along and be a panellist at one of their events: ‘How to Publish Independently with Amazon KDP’, which was organised in association with Writing.ie. and held in Dublin last weekend.

I have to say that this event was a pleasure to be part of: it lasted all day Saturday and was live streamed throughout libraries in Ireland, as well as via the Amazon KDP YouTube channel. The panels covered wide-ranging topics of interest, particularly to new writers, such as ‘How to Write a Bestseller’, ‘Marketing’, ‘It’s all in the Cover’, ‘How to Make a Book’ etc. Now that I’m onto my fifth book in less than two years, it’s easy for me to forget just how daunting some of these processes can be to people just starting out. But it isn’t too much of a stretch for me to simply cast my mind back to Christmas 2014, when I was on the verge of first uploading Holy Island. That book went on to be an international bestseller but, at the time, I had no way of knowing that. It’s so important for me to participate in these events, not only to share the knowledge I have acquired, but to remind myself of that initial excitement about the industry. And there is a lot to be excited about! Yes, it can be competitive and, yes, you need to work hard, but tell me one industry where that isn’t the case? At least you can be creative and write books which is such a rewarding end in itself.

If you’d like to watch the panels again, you can do so here.

The atmosphere was so lively and positive but at the same time there was a laid back feel which allowed people to relax into the panel discussions. I was joined by some lovely authors and industry professionals, including Mark Dawson, Hazel Gaynor and Catherine Ryan Howard. Rick O’Shea kindly compered alongside some of the team from Amazon and Victoria Fox O’Loughlin from Writing.ie, all of whom have valuable insights and experiences to share. That really struck a chord for me – we may have shared ideas about certain elements of the business, but we are each very individual in our approach and style, which is encouraging for anyone thinking about taking the leap; you don’t have to be pre-packaged in order to succeed.

Dublin itself was warm and friendly, as always. We caught up with some old friends, treated ourselves to a well deserved beverage of the alcoholic variety and thoroughly enjoyed spending time with like minded people.

Now, it’s back to work…

LJ x