The Prodigal Author Returns…

Afternoon!

Well, look who just dragged themselves out of social seclusion! Yes, you’ve guessed it… me. How are we all doing? Well, I hope!

I realise I have been somewhat remiss in writing a blog post lately, so I thought I would remedy that situation immediately and let you all know what I’ve been up to. It’s mostly tedious, so if you have better things to be doing such as watching paint dry or fish swimming around a tank, feel free to bow out now.

In a nutshell, the last month has involved:

  1. Packing up and moving our entire family from Somerset to Northumberland, just in time for Christmas. Sheer lunacy, but it’s all over now (I’m still getting flashbacks about the packing).
  2. Do I need to elaborate further? It’s a big deal, especially with an excitable four-year-old, and we celebrated in style by dragging a 13ft tree into our lounge. The problem came when we had to drag it out again…
  3. Releasing my seventh book, Dark Skies. Any indie author will tell you the kind of hands-on dedication this involves, including signing, packaging and sending paperbacks, running competitions, all manner of plates to keep spinning in the air. I don’t have a dedicated team of assistants to help me with all that but I do have a bloody fantastic husband, family, friends and fellow bibliophiles and it’s thanks to them that Dark Skies became my third UK #1 bestseller back in December. Big thanks to all of you!
  4. Renovating the new house. It has great bones but needs a lot of TLC. When I say, “a lot”, I mean there were fifteen workmen in our house just last week ripping out bathrooms, re-fitting bathrooms, replacing radiators, painting, plastering over wood chip…you name it. One thing is certain: if I never have to make a cup of sugary tea ever again, I’ll be a happy woman.
  5. Helping my son settle into his new school. He’s only four and loves going to school, but a house move and the prospect of making new friends is a lot of change in one fell swoop and it was important to give him the attention he needed.
  6. Writing two books. Oh yeah, did I forget to mention? I’m writing two books simultaneously. And if anybody ever tells you that writers don’t work hard, feel free to give them a slap around the chops from me!
  7. The usual round of events, admin, general life…

Having said all that, I thought I’d better stick my head above the parapet in case some of you wondered if I had run off to Timbuktu. It’s always a possibility, but not this week, fair readers.

In other news and on a writerly note, I want to thank everybody who has written to me recently asking for advice, mentoring or to read their works in progress. I am humbled that you feel I would have anything to add to what you have already achieved and wish that I could respond more quickly or commit to an ongoing mentoring relationship. Unfortunately, given how hectic life is at the moment and my own busy work schedule I have had to decline. This is no negative reflection on any of you and I wish you nothing but the very greatest success with your work – it is a sad fact that I do not have the time to read as much as I once did, which is something I am trying actively to remedy. Sending best wishes to all of you!

One thing that I can commit to is the reinstatement of my bi-weekly ‘Author Introduction’ feature on this blog. If there are any authors out there who would like to be featured over the coming year, please contact me at lj_ross@outlook.com with the subject line ‘Author Introductions’ and I will do my very best to include you – it’ll be on a first come, first served basis! I am also keen to showcase writers and new talent from a range of publishing backgrounds and in particular independent authors.

If any reader or budding writer has a burning question they’d like me to answer – this could relate to the DCI Ryan books, writing or publishing in general, then drop me a line with the subject line ‘Blog Questions’ and I’ll do my best to answer them in forthcoming posts!

For now, I’m off to immerse myself in the world of DCI Ryan who, it has to be said, just keeps uncovering twisty crimes in atmospheric settings…

‘Bye for now!

LJ x

 

Author Introductions #19: Louise Jensen

Happy Monday!

After a weekend spent proofreading and playing endless games of Snakes and Ladders with my son, it’s the start of another week and I have a busy one ahead of me – I’ll be heading up to Northumberland for An Evening with L J Ross at Forum Books in Corbridge, followed by an event at Newcastle City Library as part of the Books on the Tyne Festival which is ongoing at the moment and featuring lots of exciting events and authors! There is also the small matter of picking up the keys for our new house…hurrah!

For now, it’s time for me to make the next Author Introduction and, this week, I’m delighted to be joined by the lovely Louise Jensen. I’ve had the pleasure of getting to know Louise over the past couple of years through being part of a charity anthology together and as part of a recent panel at the Althorp Literary Festival and I admire how she manages to juggle being such a loving mother to three children as well as a bestselling author – it’s what we all strive for! Let’s find out a bit more about the woman behind the writer…

Louise Jensen

Louise Jensen, bestselling author of psychological fiction

 

Louise is a USA Today Bestselling Author and lives in Northamptonshire with her husband, children, madcap dog and a rather naughty cat. Louise’s first two novels, The Sister and The Gift, were both International No.1 Bestsellers and have been sold for translation to sixteen countries. The Sister was nominated for The Goodreads Awards Debut of 2016. Louise’s third psychological thriller, The Surrogate, is out now.

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

Hello, my name’s Louise Jensen and my most important job is as a mum to my three boys but secondly I write psychological thrillers. I always wanted to be a writer when I grew up and when that didn’t happen I got a ‘proper’ job instead. Several years ago, an accident left me with a disability and I began writing again to distract myself from my chronic pain and compromised mobility. But writing turned out to be more than just a good distraction. My first two novels, The Sister and The Gift were both International No.1 Bestsellers and have been sold for translation to sixteen countries. The Sister was nominated for the Goodreads Awards Debut of 2016.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

The Surrogate is newly published. It’s a story of Kat who can’t conceive but is longing for a family, and Lisa, her best friend who offers to be her surrogate. This book was so much fun to write. I thought I had control but the characters are each strong willed and took me on the ride of my life. Everyone has a secret and even writing it, I wasn’t sure who to trust. The ending has come as a real shock to readers but no-one was more shocked than me! As all my stories are, it’s a blend of mystery and unease, but also an emotional story about friendship and how far we’d go for those we love.

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  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

In real life, EVERYONE who writes. There’s a fabulous network of writers on social media and daily I read posts from those who are struggling to fit writing times around families, jobs and finances. Those who are celebrating career highs. Those who are experiencing the lows. There’s so many people out there following their dreams and I cheer on each and every one of them.

In fiction, Jo March from Little Women. She’s so feisty and confident. I longed to be like her.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Marian Keyes – I read her stories and one minute I’m laughing, the next there’s a lump in my throat, then I’m laughing again. She’s a genius.

Harlan Coben – His Myron Bolitar series has me hooked. Pacey, funny and surprisingly touching in places. An easy read when I’ve had a long day.

Finley – My 11-year-old son is hugely talented. Last week he wrote the opening to a story that is so creepy and mysterious my husband read it and thought it was the opening to my new book. He’s super talented, with an amazing vocabulary, and I’ve no doubt I’ll be reading his books one day.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

My favourite thing to do in the whole world is to sit around the dining table with my family, sharing good food and a nice bottle of wine (the adults!). Now the kids are growing it’s often hard to get them in the same place, at the same time.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Personally – I’ve made three humans!

Professionally – My debut, The Sister, selling half a million copies in its first few weeks of release and reaching No. 1 around the world.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

 Little Women – Louisa May Alcott – it’s the first book I’d read that wasn’t a mystery and made me cry! It made me want to become a writer.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

The Maid’s Room is a debut by Fiona Mitchell based on her experience of living in Singapore. The language is rich, imagery beautiful and already I’m eager for her second book.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

As a former Mindfulness Coach I’d have to say Mindfulness for Dummies written by my mentor Shamash Alidina. Gratitude, compassion and love for each other. Spread the word!

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Wonder Woman – those boots!

…Thanks for taking part, Louise! It sounds like there may be another budding writer in the family – Finley is one to watch! 😉

Wishing you all a healthy and happy week!

LJ x

 

 

 

Author Introductions #18: Nicky Black

Morning!

Today, I’m writing to you from my office in Bath which will soon be replaced with an office in Northumberland, now that we’re making the Big Move North. I’m so excited about returning to the countryside where I grew up and looking forward to introducing my son to all the best beaches (there are so many to choose from) in time for Christmas. But, if there’s one person I don’t have to convince when it comes to the beauty of the North-East, it’s lovely fellow author and friend Nicky Doherty, one half of the bestselling writing duo that comprises Nicky Black.

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Nicky Doherty, one half of bestselling writing duo Nicky Black.

Nicky Black is a collaboration between two friends, Nicky and Julie, who have known each other for around twenty years. They both had careers in urban regeneration back in the 90s, working at the heart of disadvantaged communities in the North East of England. During that time, they experienced the real grit and struggle of peoples’ everyday lives, as well as their humour and determination to lead a happy existence, whatever that meant to them.

Julie has had a career as a script writer, and Nicky has transformed two of Julie’s early scripts into novels. The first is called ‘The Prodigal,’ and the second is a work in progress called ‘Tommy Collins,’ which will be released in the Spring of 2018. To find out a little more about this dynamic duo, I asked Nicky to answer a few short questions which she kindly agreed to do. Here goes…

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I’ve been enjoying reading these interviews with some fabulous authors, so delighted to be here.

I was born and brought up in Alnwick, Northumberland, a very beautiful place that I didn’t appreciate at the time. When I’d finished my degree, I moved back to Newcastle and worked in urban regeneration for twelve years. Then I thought I’d give London a go for six months when my contract was up and ended up staying fourteen years. The last couple of years there weren’t very happy ones for me, so I ditched it all last summer and moved back up north. I also turn fifty this year which I can hardly believe. I’m officially middle-aged and the healthiest and happiest I’ve been in years!

[Blogger’s Note: I don’t think any of us can believe that you turn fifty this year, Nicky. What’s your secret?!]

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

Well, my latest book is a couple of years old now – I’ve been working on the second one since August last year. In the first book, The Prodigal, readers can expect quite a moving story, although it’s set amidst a fairly gritty backdrop of urban decay. Whilst it’s a crime novel, at its heart is a love story between a detective, Lee Jamieson, and Nicola Kelly, who is questioning her loyalty to her violent, drug-dealing husband now she has small children. Needless to say, it’s not an easy ride for either of them. I’ll leave it there as I don’t want to give away the plot…

book covers

The next one, Tommy Collins, is set on the same fictional council estate ten years earlier in 1989, and is about a young man who organises raves. It’s his escape, and he gets the chance to organise a massive party, make some serious cash and leave his life of poverty behind. Only, he borrows money from the wrong man. The Detective Chief Inspector, Peach, is a dream to write.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

Annie Lennox. I’ve always been fascinated by her: her voice, song-writing, her effortless androgyny, her dedication to making the world a better place. She’s fierce yet gentle. I can’t explain it, but that voice stops me in my tracks every time I hear it even after all these years. It may sound weirdo stalkerish, but I can’t imagine my life without her music. She also delivers the best “huh!” in pop, in my opinion.

Fiction – I had to look at my bookshelves to answer this one, but it didn’t take long. I’m going to say Heathcliff. He’s just so tortured. I know he’s a cruel character and doesn’t behave in any way heroically, but man, he breaks my heart. And he comes good in the end like all the best heroes.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Roddy Doyle. Funny, moving, gritty – three of my favourite things in any drama. He has this ability to capture mood, emotion and place without describing it in any great detail. It’s all in the dialogue. The Woman Who Walked into Doors is my favourite book of all time, A Star called Henry a close second. I met him recently and he signed my dog-eared copy of The Woman Who Walked into Doors. I’m well chuffed.

Donna Tartt – in contrast to Roddy Doyle, she describes places and people in such detail and with such elegance, I’m in awe. Perfect dialogue, too, and the stories are gripping as hell. The Goldfinch blew me away.

Hmmm. This is hard. I think I’ll say Pat Barker, though I haven’t read anything by her for a while (must rectify that). The Regeneration trilogy is so evocative and sad, but there’s always a message of hope in her books. And she’s a Geordie which is always a winner J. Oh, Catherine Cookson – what a storyteller. (There’s too many, I’ll stop now…).

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I’d like to say something cultural or healthy, but I binge watch TV I’m afraid. Once I’m into a programme, I’m addicted and have to get through it as quickly as possible. At the moment, it’s Suits for entertainment value, and Mindhunter for pure drama and a banging 70s sound track. When I’m not working, writing or binge watching, I love a good night out on the town.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Deciding to change my life and following through (that bit’s important), despite how difficult it all was. I left my job, a relationship that made me unhappy and my life in London to start afresh and give myself space to write. Happiness and a life not bogged down in stress and mistrust can’t be bought. I’m lucky that I have a great family, no mortgage, no kids, so it was achievable. I haven’t achieved what I ultimately want yet, but I’m working on it. I have a plan, and I like that.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

Easy. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. I love a rebel, especially one who goes on such a journey of self-discovery. I can’t remember how many times I finished it and went right back to the beginning again.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

The Summer of Impossible Things by Rowan Coleman. It’s not easy to pull of time-travel and make it plausible. That takes some imagination; I loved it.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Anything by Michael Morpurgo or Joyce Stranger, since she seems to think animals can’t feel pain or emotion. Even if they didn’t, we feel pain and emotion for them, and that should be enough.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Louise, from Thelma and Louise! Not that I want to shoot anyone or drive off a cliff, but I admire her loyalty, her badass independence and her bravery. And I love Susan Sarandon.  She can do no wrong in my eyes.

Thank you for having me, Louise, and best of luck with Dark Skies – looking forward to another fix of Ryan!

…Thanks, Nicky! Love your answers and, as a big fan of The Prodigal, I am already looking forward to reading your next book when it comes out. I admire your decision to change the things that weren’t working in your life and strive for a better happiness – that’s a decision I also took a few years ago. You only get the one life, so we might as well use it wisely! For now, I’m off to listen to some Annie Lennox and plot the next DCI Ryan book…

Wishing you all a wonderful week ahead!

LJ x

Author Introductions #13: C.L. Taylor

Hello!

After a distinctly sepia-hued day yesterday thanks to Hurricane Ophelia, it’s refreshing to wake up to blue skies here in Bath! Just before I get down to the serious business of writing, I’d like to make my next Author Introduction and today, it’s the lovely C. L. Taylor.

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C.L. Taylor, Sunday Times bestselling author of psychological thrillers and YA fiction.

Cally is the Sunday Times bestselling author of The Accident, The Lie, The Missing and The Escape. Her books have sold in excess of a million copies in the U.K., have been translated into over twenty languages, won awards and been optioned for television. In 2017, her YA debut thriller The Treatment was published by HarperCollins HQ.

Now, that’s what I call impressive! Let’s find out a little bit more…

  1. Tell us about yourself – don’t be shy!

Hello! My name is Cally Taylor and I live in Bristol with my partner and son. I’ve had seven novels published so far – two romantic comedies, four psychological thrillers (as C.L. Taylor) and a YA thriller (also as C.L. Taylor). My books have sold over a million copies in the UK alone and have been translated into over twenty languages. Home for Christmas was made into a feature film by an independent production company and The Lie has been optioned by the TV company who made National Treasure featuring Robbie Coltrane. I’m currently editing my fifth psychological thriller – The Fear – which will be out in March 2018.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

My latest book is my YA thriller The Treatment. I describe it as ‘Prison Break meets One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest’. It’s a tense, pacy, page-turner about a girl called Drew whose brother Mason is excluded from three different schools and sent to a residential reform academy in Northumberland. One day, when Drew is walking home and trying to avoid the school bullies, she’s bundled into an alley by a stranger. The stranger hands Drew a note from Mason saying, ‘we’re not being reformed we’re being brainwashed’ and then runs off. At first, Drew thinks her brother is just attention seeking but as she begins to investigate what’s actually happening at the academy she realises that he’s in real danger.

The Treatment Amazon

The other book I had published this year was an adult psychological thriller called The Escape about a woman called Jo who has to go on the run with her daughter in order to keep her safe.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

I don’t really have a real life hero but I respect anyone who risks their own lives to help others.  A fictional hero? I’d have to say Katniss Everdeen from The Hunger Games. She’s so much stronger, feistier and determined than I could ever be.

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Margaret Atwood. I have so much respect for her – both as a writer and a person.  Her books are clever, feminist, insightful, witty, gripping and brave. I’d love to be half the writer she is.

Belinda Bauer. She’s my queen of crime. Her books are all so different but they’re all so brilliantly written and wonderfully dark. Her ear for dialogue is pitch perfect and her characterisation is superb. There’s also a wry humour that runs through all her books that I absolutely love.

Maggie O’Farrell – Maggie’s debut After You’d Gone was the first book I’d ever read that left me not just emotionally winded but had me reeling for DAYS. To wield that much power with words is just astonishing and she writes so beautifully too. I haven’t read a Maggie O’Farrell book that I didn’t love.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I’d like to say that I do something really worthy or intellectual but actually I unwind by watching TV. I love binge watching series – anything from the Game of Thrones to Dexter to Happy Valley to Luther – but I also have a soft spot for really rubbish reality TV! It’s the only thing that really allows me to turn off my brain.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Personally – my child. Professionally – writing a book a year despite self-doubt, fear, exhaustion and worry. When I was eight years old and desperate to become an author I had no idea how many highs and lows there are in this career. It can be hugely rewarding of course but it’s hard work too. I am hugely proud that my last three books have all been Sunday Times bestsellers.

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton. It absolutely fired my imagination and brought so much magic into my life. I recently read the whole series to my son and he loved it as much as I did. It was wonderful to experience it a second time, through his eyes.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

I’m currently reading He Said/She Said by Erin Kelly and I love the idea of ‘eclipse chasers’. How amazing to travel the world to watch eclipses when most of us can only hope to see one in our lifetimes.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Hmm. I’d really want to press a book into her hands that makes her see society in a different way. I think I’d either go for ‘Home Ground’ (new writing inspired by the homeless world cup in Glasgow) or ‘Stories for Homes’ (‘a collection of witty, poignant, funny and heart-breaking short stories… reflecting the connection between the immediacy of housing crisis and the stories people tell about their lives around and within it.’).

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

I haven’t seen it yet but I would definitely like to be Wonder Woman. I would so like to be more kick ass than I am!

…Thanks, Cally! I haven’t read The Magic Faraway Tree to my son yet but it’s definitely on the list, and, as for binge watching Game of Thrones, I’d say that was time well spent! (Winter is nearly here, after all).

While we wait for the next series to come out, I’ll leave Cally to her edits and celebrating the release of her latest book, The Treatment, while I dive back into the world of DCI Ryan.

Wishing you all a wonderful week,

LJ x

Storytellers and tree-climbing

Hello!

Today, I have finally recovered from a hectic week and I thought I would take the opportunity to drop you a line…

Yesterday, I was a panellist at WOMAD festival in Wiltshire, chatting about the great experience I’ve had self-publishing while my husband kindly supervised our son climbing every visible tree in the arboretum.

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Exploring the woodland at WOMAD festival

On Wednesday night, I attended a party at the new Amazon HQ in London (very swanky it was too) and the night before, I was at the Amazon KDP Storyteller Award Ceremony. Although I didn’t enter the competition, one of my writer friends, Dave Leadbeater, was up for the award against some stiff competition. I’m delighted to say that he won! All the finalists were amazing and it was a pleasure to be invited along to the inaugural ceremony. It was also a great opportunity to catch up with Keith Houghton and his lovely wife, whose pictures I have borrowed as I managed to come away from both events without a single image on my iPhone – thanks Keith!

Amazon HQ Party

With Lynn at the new Amazon HQ 🙂

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With Mr Ross, Keith and Lynn Houghton at the Amazon Storyteller Award Ceremony at The Ned

Congratulations and commiserations aside, these events provide the opportunity for a hard-working writer and mother such as myself to let loose for the evening, casting off the shackles of sobriety with cheerful abandon. At this point, I should clarify that the evening was all very smart and lovely at a brand new upscale hotel in London (The Ned), rather than being a debauched night in Vegas or a sweaty club in San Antonio, neither of which I could tolerate these days. Since my husband and partner-in-crime was also invited, we were practically skipping into the venue like a pair of reprobates on day release.

Even without our irrepressible optimism and willingness to throw ourselves into the spirit of the occasion, I can tell you it was a fabulous night and a credit to all those who organised it. On a broader level, I think it is a wonderful idea to create an award which celebrates the power of the reader: by accounting for the book’s commercial appeal, Amazon are thereby giving significant weight to readers’ interaction with the book. As I have said elsewhere, I believe that readers are the single most important judge of what constitutes ‘good’ and ‘bad’ fiction and this is a very positive step in the right direction.

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The winner, David Leadbeater, alongside Lily Cole who is a literary ambassador and Douglas Gurr, UK Country Manager at Amazon. Photo credit: MinsterFM.com

Speaking of my lovely readers, I’ve had quite a few messages querying whether we will be seeing an audiobook of ‘Cragside’ and I am happy to tell you…yes, you will! By way of explanation: every two or three books, a new contract with Audible must be arranged so that they can commit to producing the next books I have in mind for the series, which is standard practice and takes a little time. Likewise, time is needed to secure the services of the same audio narrator, who has lent his voice artistry to the other books in the series. We are working as quickly as we can to bring the audio version to you and I hope you will enjoy it as much as the e-book and print readers have done!

At the moment, I am excited to tell you that my family is planning a permanent move back up to my native Northumberland, which is something we have hoped to do for a long time. My husband’s career (and my former life as a lawyer) precluded the possibility of moving too far away from London but now the day-to-day elements of his work allow us the freedom to move home. This means our son can see his grandparents more regularly and I can go roaming around the hills and coastlines of the land I love, looking for more inspiration. Yippee!

When I’m not house-hunting, I’ll be making a start on the next DCI Ryan book (‘Dark Skies’) this week, before I sit down to write in earnest, as well as working on the finer details of a new series of mystery books and continuing to write a standalone thriller I’ve been trying to finish for eighteen months…no rest for the wicked, eh?

I hope you all have a wonderful week!

LJ x

P.S. I’ve begun a new feature on my blog which I plan to do every Monday until December, which introduces a new author who you may or may not already be familiar with. I love to hear about the work of other talented writers and I hope you do too! 🙂

 

 

A note of thanks…

They say, ‘lightning never strikes twice’ but sometimes, in the world of books, it does.

Let me explain…

As some of you will be aware, back in May 2015, my debut novel Holy Island nearly gave me a cardiac arrest when it managed to top the UK Kindle chart at #1 (knocking The Girl on the Train off the top spot, although I don’t imagine that gave Paula too many sleepless nights considering the rollicking and well-deserved success of her own book!) Nonetheless, when that happened, I was in a state of mild shock for quite some time afterward and probably, on some subliminal level, I still am. You see, I had no expectations. I hadn’t read every tome on ‘How to be a Writer’ and hadn’t taken endless courses on creative writing, although I was well trained in drafting as a lawyer. I didn’t have an established author platform or a degree in marketing, nor an agent, for that matter. Added to which, I had recently turned down an offer of traditional publication in favour of independent publishing through Amazon KDP and some people probably thought I’d taken leave of my senses. I didn’t have a big publishing house to support me, to pay for advertising space on tables in chain book stores or in magazines, to plaster it across bill boards or distribute my book on supermarket shelves, to guarantee membership rights to all the ‘right’ associations and don’t even get me started on things like television and foreign rights. (N.B. It is a fallacy to think that a traditional deal will equate to investment of this kind – the publisher is a business and they must prioritise resources like any other commercial venture, which usually means investing in established, ‘big hitting’ authors rather than unknowns).

No pressure, then. 

What I did have was complete freedom to produce a body of work on my own terms, without anybody telling me ‘you can’t do that’, or ‘you should write like this.’ I had access to professional editing and proofreading, which I sourced myself, to ensure quality standards. I started out making my own covers but could easily hire a professional cover designer, as many of them work freelance nowadays. I was responsible for making the book visible, as far as I could. Let’s not forget that none of this would have been possible without the revolutionary publishing platform Amazon created, which allows thousands of people to realise their dreams rather than relying on the decision of a minority few. Not every indie book will become a bestseller but at least the readers are the ultimate arbiters and every writer is given the chance to try.

Louise Call to Bar

The day I was called to the bar, quite a few years ago!

 

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This little bumble bee gifted me the time and impetus to change career

The fact is, I just wanted to write my story and retain creative control. I had resigned a well-paid job as a regulatory lawyer and decided to take a short career break to figure out what I’d prefer to do with my life. As an avid reader, writing seemed to beckon. However, the process was – let’s say interrupted by the arrival of our son, Ethan. Having spent a lifetime being told that I might never be able to have children, this news came as a huge, momentous, wonderful surprise and seemed like a kind of miracle. I felt extremely protective of the little bundle I carried and felt less inclined to scurry around the streets of London looking for another stressful job. It was therefore thanks to Ethan that I decided to open my laptop and start writing the story I’d first imagined on a train journey between Newcastle and Edinburgh, looking out across the North Sea to Holy Island.

The success of its sequels (Sycamore Gap, Heavenfield, Angel and High Force) has been very much like a series of aftershocks. With each new release, I am consumed with nerves and very anxious to know how it will be received. There is never any sense of complacency or an assumption that readers will enjoy a book because they have enjoyed the others. The same effort, sweat and tears goes into every manuscript. I certainly never thought another book of mine would reach the same top spot as Holy Island because…well, lightning doesn’t strike twice. I’m not a greedy person and I remember very clearly saying to my husband, “That’s it, for me. If I never sell another book, I’ll always be able to cherish this moment.” Turns out, I have an even kinder readership than I thought, because on 1st June my forthcoming book Cragside managed to claw its way to the #1 UK Kindle spot – and it hasn’t been released yet!

 

I don’t think a simple ‘thank you’ can really convey the deep gratitude I feel for all those people who have supported my writing and enjoyed the DCI Ryan series. It’s great to be able to say a book was a bestseller but, more importantly, to be able to say it came into being because a million people have read my books and deemed them worthy. The readers are the true gatekeepers and it is their opinion that matters to me the most.

Thanks to all of you!

LJ x

 

Hump Day Banter

Morning!

Here in Bath, the weather is wet and windy, serving to remind me that Spring in the United Kingdom is a moody bitch and should never be relied upon. Thus, I donned my ‘Inspector Gadget’ trench coat and set out of the house – laptop case and umbrella precariously balanced in one hand, small child clutched in the other – and dodged puddles and splash back on the way to his school (which is, mercifully, only a five-minute walk away. Even I’m not lazy enough to use the car for that kind of commute). I want to tell you it was heart-warming to see us frolicking in the rain but, in reality, I had badly miscalculated the trench coat and was sweating like a P-I-G as I hop-scotched my way across the playground. Mini-Ross was incensed by the fact his beloved stash of sparkles (fake jewelled things he found in the sand pit and has now claimed as his pirate booty) were not at hand to bring in for ‘show and tell’ and bemoaned the fact throughout our fraught journey.

Having deposited Mini-Ross amongst his comrades/pirate crew, I settled myself with a *strong* coffee and, just before I get back to the main business of writing books, I thought I’d share a few musings on life. This is, after all, ‘Hump Day’ and we need all the help we can get.

Before I go on, let me confess that I had no idea what the hell ‘Hump Day’ was until recently. Logic told me it was a reference to the middle of the week, but I need to be clear about the fact that I am neither cool enough, nor informed enough about current trends in social parlance, to know for sure. Eventually, curiosity led me to google it…obvs. There are many other examples I could name, but let’s suffice to say that my bants is pure 1990s. I still say things like ‘dude’ (non-gender-specific) and reference lines from Wayne’s World, which tells you all you need to know.

Now we’ve cleared that up, I was reflecting on what a funny old world we live in today. I mean, it’s always been funny; human nature seems to lead us in cycles of behaviour, both small and large-scale. Within our own busy little lives, it’s hard to step outside and see the bigger picture, especially when that ‘bigger picture’ will always be so opaque due to the natural constraints of time, access to information and the world being in constant flux. It’s like books: when I was younger, I used to feel an odd sort of depression about the fact I would never be able to read every book ever written. It would take many lifetimes to do that, especially given the fantastic scope of literature available out there, so it was always an unrealistic goal. Age and maturity have taught me a lesson that was obvious from the start: ignorance is unavoidable, for we are all ignorant if your bench mark is knowing ‘everything there is to know’. The important thing is striving to learn, to understand new things and, perhaps most importantly, to understand your fellow man.

Easier said than done, isn’t it? Almost every day, I read something in a certain broadsheet, or online, or speak to someone with wildly opposing views and silently face-palm. But I remind myself a person is the sum total of their life experience and views are conjured as a direct product of that experience.

Politics, religion, money, sex…it can divide opinion. But, is this such a bad thing? I see people from time-to-time on social media up in arms about political discourse. Hush, they say, stop talking about it. I’m feeling uncomfortable. Why? The day you tell people they cannot speak freely is a sad day for humankind. Freedom of expression should not come with limitations, even when the content is unpalatable to you. An opposing view can bring you to a closer understanding and re-affirmation of your own principles, or it can lead you to re-evaluate. On that point, it amazes me how many people are affronted by the prospect of changing their standpoint: I presume they think it would be a sign of weakness or something of that kind. But it isn’t weakness to think or to question – is it?

When I was growing up, I remember an elderly member of the family would tell me “little girls should be seen and not heard.”

What utter nonsense. 

Setting aside gender issues for a moment, ‘expression’ and ‘manners’ are two vastly different things. Surely, it is possible to express your views politely? The problem comes when people like my relative conflate the two. Shutting someone up is not a question of manners, it is an effort to undermine their contribution to a discourse. That’s a dangerous road because, by doing that, you raise a generation of bleating sheep, quick to follow the herd. It makes me smile, sometimes, when my son pipes up in a restaurant to order his own food (aged 3), or disagrees with a parental edict, or seeks to negotiate how many minutes longer before it’s time for a bath. I believe it’s important for him to respect his parents, who know best what will protect him at his vulnerable age, but I will never seek to quieten his enquiring mind. I hope he never loses the confidence to speak out and I certainly won’t be the one to shut him up.

This gets me to thinking about how often we are, frankly, wrong about people. It’s a sad statement on society that we so often assume the worst, rather than assuming the best. It is, of course, a product of our own individual paradigm. If I’m feeling sad or dejected, it’s harder to view the world with optimism on that given day. Conversely, if I’m feeling elated, it’s harder to view a situation with the objectivity it deserves. Over the last couple of years, it’s been eye-opening to hear some of those instant assumptions people have made about me, like, “I thought you’d be a Tory-voter” (well, there’s no need to insult me). But hey, I’m guilty of my own fair share of value judgments. I was dining recently at a restaurant where there was a man in his fifties (perm-tanned, face-lifted and wearing very tight clothing) having dinner with a woman young enough to be his youngest daughter who *quite clearly* wasn’t his daughter. Oh yeah, I was Judgy McJudgerson, you betcha.

So, what can we take from all this on Hump Day? Let me summarise in my native Geordie:

  1. Divn’t stop the bairns chattin’ aboot life and the universe.
  2. Divn’t be scared about asking questions. Gan’ canny, though, you divn’t want to insult people.
  3. Just ’cause a bloke is romancing a younger lass, doesn’t mean he’s an old perv’. It might be true love.

 On that note, I’m off to write about DS Phillips’ enduring love for DI MacKenzie, who has been having a tough time after her ordeal with ‘The Hacker’… tune in soon for updates!

Love,

LJ x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Festivals, libraries and bookish things!

Hello folks!

I don’t know about the rest of you, but the last couple of weeks have passed by in the blink of an eye. After a (very) late flight up to Newcastle, there was time for a brief catch-up with my parents before heading down to Noir at the Bar, organised by the lovely Victoria. Essentially, it’s an opportunity to hear fellow writers reading from their own work, in a positive environment! I wasn’t reading this time but was there in full support of all those who did 🙂

The next day, I was off to Durham for an interview with the Northern Echo and the article can be found here. It was a great opportunity to take a stroll around the city and re-acquaint myself with its nooks and crannies.

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This is the view from Prebend’s Bridge. To the right you can see the top of the cathedral and to the left, you can just about see the boathouse which is the site of Anna’s fictional cottage in my books.

After that, I headed back to Northumberland in time for a lovely event hosted by Forum Books in Corbridge. ‘An Evening with LJ Ross and Special Guest Nicky Black’ was attended by around sixty people and completely sold out, so my thanks go out to Helen and everyone who helped to arrange that and, of course, to Nicky Black for sharing her time with us all.  It was wonderful to meet all of you!

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At Tea and Tipple, the venue in Corbridge


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The beautiful display of my books – thank you Helen and team!

The next day involved more writing and work, but I had time to have a quick look around Newcastle Castle before popping along to the Lit & Phil to take part in Newcastle Noir Festival 2017 on the ‘Geordie Noir’ panel. It was great to meet fellow authors Shelley Day, Howard LinskeyMatt Wesolowski and Jacky Collins (a.k.a. Dr Noir) did a fantastic job of organising a weekend of brilliant crime panels with a little help from an outstanding team of volunteers.

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On the Geordie Noir panel

The final stop on my whirlwind roadshow was Darlington’s Crown Street Library. The library, like so many, is facing the threat of closure which made the visit even more poignant for me. The library is one of Darlington’s old, beautiful buildings and the people who run it are dedicated staff whose main objective appears to be furthering literacy, learning and opportunity for local people. It’s heartbreaking to see closures all around the country, which is why I was very happy to speak to another sixty people and donate some more books. It was an absolute pleasure to be there, and thank you to Vicky and all her staff for the kind invitation.

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Signing books at Crown Street Library

It’s back to business as usual now, and I’m working hard to finish the next DCI Ryan book whilst also managing a lot of other creative projects. Believe me, if I could write any faster, I would! Sadly, like everybody, I am often interrupted by any/ all of the following: children, housework, errands, admin crap, writer’s block, spending time with family or loved ones, not becoming a social recluse… in addition, I’m happy to admit I’m only human. I am plagued by self-doubt as much as the next person and it prevents me from writing like a machine. I want to be sure that what I’ve written won’t disappoint readers and that I will be happy to publish the end product. I don’t want to rush a book because, inevitably, the product won’t be good.

Having said all that, today was very productive! Now, to tick off the other 587513985934 items on my ‘To Do’ list… 😉

Hope you all have a great week,

LJ x

Headspace

Hello there!

I’m writing to you from sunny Cornwall, where I have been staying with my husband and son during his Easter holidays. The weather is wonderful but this is a working holiday for me, so I’ve been rationing my time on the beach while I try to tick off the numerous items on my ‘To Do’ list!

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How am I supposed to focus on work against that backdrop?!

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Right before he face-planted in the sand…

As always, I’ve been busy writing articles here and there (for example, this one for What’s New in Publishing), planning forthcoming events in the North-East (a bit of a mini-tour, as it happens) and, of course, writing. The business of being an independent author does tend to divide my time and it can be frustrating to be taken away from the creative side of my work, when I could happily spend all day writing new fiction. But, I am a realist. Managing my existing books, responding to all the kind messages from readers and budding writers and being a halfway decent mother to my three-year-old son can be a difficult juggling act but no more so than many other people face, that’s for sure. Besides, I wouldn’t have it any other way. I take pride in my son growing up in an environment where both parents work and share his childcare equally, supporting one another to succeed in their own dreams but always with the same ultimate goal: to provide a happy, secure and balanced childhood for him.

As any mother will tell you, there are times when you feel stretched too thinly; when you feel that life is becoming overwhelming and there simply aren’t enough hours in the day. Confidence ebbs and you end up feeling like you aren’t doing anything to the best of your ability – you’re just keeping a lot of plates spinning in a slightly hap-hazardous way.

You are not alone!

A good example of this comes from a lady I met at the London Book Fair, who told me I seemed to “have it all” and she wondered if she would ever succeed. Self-doubt is the plague of anyone who is trying to break into a new industry, myself included, but let me say this: I believe we are all in this life together. I don’t live a charmed existence – nobody does. We all face our own struggles and our own daily battles. Don’t be fooled by the Instagram-filtered gloss permeating the world of social media, because it only represents the high point of somebody’s day and not the average, hardworking, unglamorous moments which make up our collective lives.

LJ x

 

 

Breaking new ground…

Hello!

First of all, let me say that I can’t believe it’s nearly March. Where the heck have the past two months gone? I suppose there has been quite a lot going on, starting with the release of my fifth book, High Force. It was available to pre-order for about six weeks prior to its general release on 31st January 2017 and reached #2 in the UK charts more than once, settling around the top five for quite a few weeks. I’m so grateful to everyone who gave it a go!

When that sort of wonderful thing happens, one or two people ask me whether the release of a new book has become second nature, or something that leaves me unmoved. To which I respond…

Hell, no!

I feel nervous and excited every time I write and release a new book. My stomach churns at the prospect of readers not enjoying the new offering, even though the logical part of my brain tells me it would be impossible to please everyone and I should concentrate on writing for myself. I certainly become engrossed by the story when I am in the thick of it but, once that process ends, I’m left wondering whether it’s really any good after all. I agonise about almost every part of the story. It is picked apart and polished through the editing process but even then self-doubt gnaws away at my innards.

It is always a fabulous, flabbergasting surprise to find so many readers enjoying the books and to say I’m grateful would be an understatement. Their enjoyment in the novels I’ve written gives me the courage to continue to write and to weave together the stories swirling around my head. I’ve been very fortunate over the past two years but, believe me, I never take that for granted. The act of creating something brand new and putting it out into the world takes courage and it is something all of us share, in one way or another!

On the topic of unleashing myself on the wider world, I had an unexpected birthday treat this year. On 10th February, The Times decided to put my old mug on the front cover of their ‘Arts’ supplement, as well as a miniature version on the front cover of the main newspaper to accompany a two-page spread about bestselling authors who decided to publish independently (through Amazon). In case you didn’t catch it, the article is here.

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I nearly had a minor heart attack when I saw this

Being quite a private person, the world of public relations and press is like an alien planet to me. However, I try to visit every so often in the interests of promoting the value of indie authors who are not only good storytellers, but who work hard and produce books to such a quality standard they are indistinguishable from those put out by mainstream publishers.

Speaking of storytellers, Amazon is running a Storyteller Competition at the moment with a great cash prize and, more importantly, the prospect of helpful marketing and the launch of a new writing career if there are any budding authors tuning in. The details are here and it’s well worth considering!

Bye for now!

LJ x