Author Introductions #31: Morton S. Gray

Good morning, folks!

Today, I’m writing to you from Majorca, where we’ve been enjoying a villa holiday with some good friends of ours and their children, too, while we collectively squeeze the last drop out of summer. Soon enough, it’ll be back to work and school but, until then, there’s time to make my next Author Introduction! This week, I’m delighted to welcome Morton S. Gray to the blog.

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Morton lives with her husband, two sons and Lily, the tiny white dog, in Worcestershire, U.K. She has been reading and writing fiction for as long as she can remember, penning her first attempt at a novel aged only fourteen. She is a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association and The Society of Authors. Her debut novel The Girl on the Beach was e-published in January 2017, after she won Choc Lit Publishing ‘Search for a Star’ competition. The story follows a woman with a troubled past as she tries to unravel the mystery surrounding her son’s head teacher, Harry Dixon. This book is also available as a paperback as of 10 April 2018.

Morton’s second book for Choc Lit The Truth Lies Buried was published as an e-book on 1 May 2018. Another romantic suspense novel, the book tells the story of Jenny Simpson and Carver Rodgers as they uncover secrets from their past. Morton previously worked in the electricity industry in committee services, staff development and training. She has a Business Studies degree and is a fully qualified clinical hypnotherapist and Reiki Master. She also has diplomas in Tuina acupressure massage and energy field therapy. She enjoys crafts, history and loves tracing family trees. Having a hunger for learning new things is a bonus for the research behind her books.

Sounds like a multi-talented lady! Let’s find out more… 

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I have always enjoyed reading and writing. Like many people, I got caught up in the education sausage machine, went to university and did professional qualifications. I then spent sixteen years working for Midlands Electricity and the only writing I did was meeting minutes, reports and training materials.

Making a brave decision as I approached my forties, I decided to leave a well-paid full-time job to start my own business, as I’d got to the stage of needing something different with more meaning and was not seeing as much of my son as I wanted. Everyone thought I was mad as at that point, as I was a divorced sole parent, but I have no regrets at all.

I came to write seriously after my second son was born. I attended writing classes and did a course with the Open College of the Arts. I joined the Romantic Novelists’ Association’s New Writer’s Scheme, which allows an invaluable novel critique for each year you are a member and began to shortlist in novel competitions. All along, I’d had this dream of being published by Choc Lit, so you can imagine my delight when my debut novel The Girl on the Beach won Choc Lit Publishing’s ‘Search for a Star’ competition in 2016.

 

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

 

I like to take my readers on a journey to solve some sort of mystery. In my second published novel, The Truth Lies Buried, my heroine, Jenny, is at a turning point in her life – her mother has just died and she doesn’t want to return to a job in London. A friend suggests she starts a small cleaning business and her first client is a widower, Carver. The couple realise quite early on that they have something huge in common, both of their fathers disappeared twenty-five years before. It is the mystery of their fathers’ disappearance that they need to solve, at the same time coming to terms with their own personal tragedies and finding even more to bind them together.

 

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

 

In real life, my hero is my husband. He’s a great dad and is a real Mr Fix-it, be it computer, situation or something else not working.

In fiction – I pondered this question for quite a while; did I go for Mr Darcy in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, John Thornton in Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South, or Ian Fleming’s James Bond perhaps? I decided in the end to go for a heroine instead and pick Elizabeth Gilbert in Eat, Pray, Love. A lot of people have watched the film, but I find the book teaches me something different each time I read it. She gifted herself a year to travel and found herself and love on the journey.

 

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

 

Sue Moorcroft – Sue was my original inspiration when I started to write. I absolutely love her Middledip books, especially Starting Over, published when she was with my own publisher Choc Lit. I’ve been lucky to attend several courses with Sue over the years and admire her way of writing and teaching. Reading one of her novels is like settling into a comfortable armchair, as they always deliver.

Barbara Erskine – The combination of historical and mythical in her novels is enthralling. Since reading Lady of Hay when it was first published in 1986, I have gone on to read the majority of her novels. I can’t remember which of her books it was that made my heart thud as I read towards the climax, possibly The Warrior’s Princess. I always say that if a novel can produce a physical reaction in me, be it tears, anger or in this case fear, it is well written. I recently attended a session at the Romantic Novelists’ Association (RNA) conference where Barbara was interviewed by RNA chair, Nicola Cornick and it was fascinating to gain an insight into her background and the source of her wonderful stories – a real fan girl moment!

LJ Ross – Since I discovered your books, I’ve been hooked and have read the lot, not hesitating to pre-order when the opportunity arises. Originally attracted to your work because of the North East settings, as we have holidayed in County Durham and Northumberland for many years, I will confess to being a little bit in love with DCI Ryan.

[Blogger’s Note: Thank you, Morton! I quite fancy him, myself…]

 

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

 

I love spending time with my family and friends, reading, walking my dog and learning new things, especially crafts. I have recently been on courses for lino cut pictures, silver clay jewellery and glass bead making. My overriding hobby is researching my family history, which I have done for many years.

 

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

 

Difficult one! Personally, producing my two lovely sons. Career-wise, running my own business and getting my books published.

 

  1. What was your favourite book as a child?

 

Five on a Treasure Island by Enid Blyton. All my junior school essays had treasure, big brothers and adventure. I just laughed, as the plot to my latest novel The Truth Lies Buried has buried treasure and adventure – not much changed there then!

 

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

 

All That Was Lost by Alison May. I was fortunate to read an advance copy of this novel, as it isn’t published until 6 September 2018. It is about an aging stage medium and really makes you think about belief, identity and expectations. I’m still thinking about it well after turning the last page.

 

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

 

I have every admiration for anyone who takes on a public office like this, regardless of party. It must be such a stressful existence and one in which you can never please everyone and at times no one at all. If I was being facetious, I would suggest Game of Thrones and if I was being kind I would recommend a book on relaxation or hygge.

 

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

 

Wonder Woman of course. Who wouldn’t want the opportunity to help others and maybe save the world? P.S. Might need a diet to look good in the outfit though!

 

…Thanks, Morton! I’ve also met Sue Moorcroft and thought she was a lovely woman, so I can imagine her being very inspirational as a teacher or as a writer. It’s wonderful to read about women empowering other women because, although life doesn’t always need to be gendered, it certainly doesn’t hurt to know that we can support each other in the world of publishing or elsewhere. It’s been great having you on the blog and I wish you every success with your latest book!

Right now, it’s time to make some more freckles in the sunshine ahead of a busy autumn/winter (DCI Ryan fans, stay tuned for some VERY exciting news towards the end of the month!).

Until next time…

 

LJ x

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