Author Introductions #21: S E Lynes

Good morning!

It’s a snowy day here in Northumberland and the snowflakes are so fat you could sit and watch them fall for hours, admiring their perfect formation. However, there is work to be done! I’m nearly finished with one book and will then be moving straight on to the next, so it’s been a busy February!

But now, I’m taking a break to make my next Author Introduction. This week, I’m delighted to welcome the lovely S E Lynes to the blog. After graduating from Leeds University, S E Lynes lived in London before moving to Aberdeen to be with her husband. In Aberdeen, she worked as a Radio Producer at the BBC before moving with her husband and two young children to Rome, where she lived for five years (that sounds amazing). There, she began to write while her children attended nursery. After the birth of her third child and upon her return to the UK, she gained an MA in Creative Writing from Kingston University. She combines writing with teaching at Richmond Adult Community College and bringing up her three children in Teddington, Middlesex.  She is the author of critically acclaimed psychological thriller, Valentina, published by Blackbird books. Mother, her follow up, was published by Bookouture in November 2017 and The Pact is out tomorrow!

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S E Lynes, best selling author of psychological thrillers

So, let’s find out a bit more about this talented lady, shall we?

  1. Tell us a little about yourself – don’t be shy!

I’m a creative writing tutor at Richmond Adult Community College and the author of psychological thrillers, Valentina, Mother and The Pact. I am married and have three children aged 19, 18 and 12. I met my husband when I was eighteen and each year on our anniversary (if we remember it) we agree to try another year. We don’t like to rush these things.

  1. How about your latest book – what can readers look forward to when they pick it up?

My latest book is called The Pact. Readers can look forward to a super-contemporary, tense and emotional read, looking at parenting in the age of social media, the lasting impact of abuse and how our past impacts the decisions we make in the present. I can promise the usual dark, highly unsettling experience. The novel has three voices and I particularly enjoyed attempting the modern day teenage vernacular, with help from my daughter.

  1. Who is your hero in real life and in fiction?

I can’t pick one, that’s impossible, soz! In life, my mum – she is an artist (a ceramicist), she reads widely and is always my first reader. I value her opinion enormously and admire her stoicism and sensitivity. I admire my sister, Jackie, who has devoted her life to helping others through her work with Comic Relief, as well as juggling three young children. And I admire my husband, who loves me even though he knows me and that’s a feat in itself.

In fiction, my hero … no, no, I can’t … too many – but one of the jobs of the writer, as I see it, it to show how ordinary people are heroes in their own lives, simply by fighting their own battles and trying to live each day in the best and kindest way they can.

(Blogger’s Note: I couldn’t agree more – and this is one of my favourite answers to this question, so far!)

  1. Who are your three favourite writers – and why?

Short story writer, Alice Munro, is probably my all-time favourite, particularly her early collections, Dance of the Happy Shades and Runaway. There is a story of hers called Walker Brothers Cowboy, which is, for me, perfection. Like a lot of the great writers, she is capable of shining a light on seemingly insignificant moments and redefining them as life-altering, sometimes shattering, and that takes great skill and sensitivity.

I was very influenced by Gillian Flynn. I have only read Gone Girl of hers but I can still remember being struck from page one by the quality of the writing and later by the humour – there are some laugh out loud moments. I remember thinking, if I write a psychological thriller, I want to have an undercurrent of dark humour and I want my writing to be of this quality. So, I guess that is what I was aspiring to when I wrote my first thriller, Valentina.

I am also a big Pat Barker fan. I have heard her talk and she wrote three novels before being published with her fourth. In order to find her voice, she had to return to her roots, which she did with her debut, Union Street, and the result was a gritty, authentic piece of work. In the Regeneration trilogy, she mixes fictional characters with fictionalised versions of real people such as Siegfried Sassoon and Wilfred Owen. Without Pat Barker, I would never have had the courage to use the Yorkshire Ripper in the fictional world of my main character, Christopher, as I did in Mother.

  1. When you’re not writing, what is your favourite way to spend your time?

I really like hanging out. I have a gold medal in hanging out. I like to have coffee or drinks with friends and love a bloody good chat. I love Sunday mornings – big dog walk, then listening to Cerys Matthews on Radio 6 Music while assembling some sort of big stew or a roast dinner for family of friends.

  1. What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?

Professionally, I could say getting published after ten years but that’s not my achievement, it’s down to Stephanie Zia at Blackbird Books and her intern at the time, Rosalie Love, who read the first chapter of Valentina and asked for the rest. So, no, it’s not the getting published, it’s the sticking at it when there was no real hope, writing three novels for no other reason than to write them. I was ready to give up when it finally happened. Valentina is my fourth book.

7. What was your favourite book as a child?

Winnie the Pooh.

  1. Have you read any books recently that have really captured your imagination?

I guess the obvious ones are The Golden Compass, The Night Circus, which absolutely did, but Wolf Hall and Bringing Up the Bodies had me gripped and I cannot wait for the third.

  1. If the Prime Minister knocked at your front door and asked to borrow a book, which one would you recommend they read?

Something that would educate her as to how normal people live and the struggles they face. I don’t know if someone has written a contemporary novel about the day to day reality of working in the National Health Service or any public service, but if they have, I would recommend that.

  1. Finally, if you could be any character from a movie, which would it be?

Catniss Everdene. She’s a legend.

…Thanks, Susie! I’ve read Valentina and enjoyed it very much, so will look forward to reading your other books very soon. Thanks for telling us a little more about the woman behind the writer and I’m sure there are many aspiring writers reading your story who will feel inspired to continue their journey.

Wishing you all a very healthy and happy week, tune in next time to meet some more great authors!

LJ x

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